Monthly Archives

June 2016

CEL Robox, “a workshop in a box”

By | Education | No Comments

“Robox is an amazing tool for learning. In my studies, it has allowed me to bring my ideas and concepts into the physical world. Producing something traditionally which is as complex or intricate as what can be produced using a 3D printer, would require years of training on professional tools or be impossible to be produced as a single object. This obviously would be an impossibility for a student who wants to envision their ideas into reality. As a student myself, I do not have the skills or knowledge to use high level manufacturing equipment, but have unique ideas. By removing the complexities of the production process, it allows multiple ideas to be produced with ease.

“The innovative design of the Robox 3D printer allows easy to load materials, again, reducing the complexity of the production process. Its simple UI offers ease of use to both new and experienced users with the advanced functionality. My favourite feature is the heated bed, this allows printing to start up almost immediately, and not require bed preparation; which is the case for many 3D printers.

“Robox allows people like myself, to be able to envision our ideas, and make them reality. By having physical objects, we learn from mistakes in design, and gain a more practised knowledge of design. Robox is essentially a workshop in a box.”

Writhlington-SchoolJames Stewart
Student
Writhlington School

Spiral Printing on Robox

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, Printables, Software Updates, Stuff and Things | 4 Comments

If you’ve downloaded the latest version of AutoMaker then you may have noticed that we’ve activated Spiral Printing for you to play with. Robox is particularly good at spiral printing as it offers the highest ranges of wall thickness without having to remove and replace the nozzle.

Below is a quick guide on how to best use this new feature.
There are a number of things that you should be aware of when trying this feature.

  1. Only place one object on the bed at any time.
    Because of the nature of spiral printing the flow of material from the nozzles does not stop and start. Placing more than one object on the bed means that the models would be impossible to print in one continuous extrusion.
  2. Ensure that your print has only one continuous island from bottom to top.
    This is for the same reason – multiple islands on any layer means that the flow of material has to stop and start. Spiral printing is designed to avoid this.
  3. Consider how thick you want the base to be
    This is one of the few controls Automaker has for spiral printing, the number of layers you choose and the layer thickness will equate to your base thickness before spiral printing starts. The first layer is always 0.3mm and as a guide I would ensure that this is the minimum filament width to ensure good adhesion to the bed. The sequence layers heights are controlled by, yes you’ve guessed it, ‘layer height’. So for example if you’ve chosen a layer height of 0.2mm and 5 base layers your spiral print with have a 1.1mm thick base. (0.3mm + (4 x 0.2mm))
  4. Think about what wall thickness you want
    After the base of your part is completed the system moves to the spiral printed section, continuously moving up as it orbits the perimeter of your design laying down a single line of filament. The wall thickness is controlled by the perimeter width and because its only going to be done in one pass you may want to increase it and use the larger 0.8mm nozzle to create wall thickness of up to 1.2mm. As a guide I’ve found that the ratio between layer height and wall thickness should be between 2:1 – 5:1, the thicker the wall and the smaller the layer height the more likely overhangs will be printed perfectly.
  5. The part must be solid, not hollowed out with a wall thickness
    Because we are using ‘Solid layers at Bottom’ and perimeter thickness to control the thickness of your part the part needs to be a solid to start with. If you want an inner and outer shell, and don’t mind a hollow centre you can use an idea I had when designing the is thermal mug: add a very thin cut down through the part to make each layer a single perimeter again. On the photo below, you can see that the sequence of printing is outside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> inside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> outside surface of the bowl… and so on…Thermal MugSpiral Mug Section Small
    6 . Your design is less than 99mm tall
    Robox has a 100mm Z-build height, but because of the way Cura adds the Z move to every move on the layer sometimes the sliced part will come out slightly above 100mm. The post processor will throw this out as impossible print, so to avoid this scale your part to ensure it is less than 99mm high.

Robox_spiral_cup_iso

You can download the cup above from this link. robox_spiral_mug.stl

Robox_spiral_lee_hand

Or the Vase with Support engineer Lee’s face on it by clicking the image above. LeeVase_Mk2.stl

AutoMaker update – 2.01.01

By | News, Software Updates | No Comments

We’re pleased to announce that AutoMaker 2.01.01 is now available – this release should not only improve prints but also addresses some of the issues users have raised.

We do read all of your posts and look to include as many changes and fixes as we can. We’re guided by our customers so please keep your comments coming! AM 2.01.01 Forum

The main changes in this release are a completely revised estimated print time calculator – it is now (usually!) just a few minutes out for prints that take many hours, but do let us know if you find a model that gives you incorrect results.

The post-processor has been modified to improve small-section print quality. This improves the overall appearance of the majority of prints and we’re really pleased with the results we’re seeing.

We’ve also added the ability to create spiral prints and improved the support for multiple printers and removed the message telling you that AutoMaker is up-to-date.

The firmware now allows you to resume a print from an error state when you’re not connected to AutoMaker – pressing the flashing red eject button will attempt to resume the print. Connecting to a computer will help you diagnose a problem and may still be necessary in some circumstances.

We’re going to be working on lots of exciting changes over the coming weeks – but a couple of highlights are:

Beta tools – we’ll be introducing open Beta downloads so that anyone who is interested can try out early version of major features. The first of these will be the Robox Root, which will allow users to use their desktop AutoMaker to access and control printers connected to another device on the LAN (e.g. a Raspberry Pi).

Language updates – we’re very aware that the language packs are out of date and we’ll be working with our partners to consolidate languages over the coming weeks.

Maker’s Muse review

By | News, Robox User Blog | No Comments

This week Angus Deveson from Maker’s Muse released an updated review of the CEL Robox, courtesy of our friends at HobbyKing who provided a loan unit.

Angus points out that Robox offers users capabilities only found in 3D printers many times its price with a number of innovative and unique features – such as our patented needle valve flow control technology or locking safety door – not found in any other 3D printer. He also notes how exceptionally well-suited Robox is for the education sector in particular, which is a big reason why it’s the leading 3D printer in schools.

The video is around 16 minutes long and covers quite a range of topics.

Feel free to get in touch if you’d like to learn more about Robox or anything mentioned in the video.