3D printing and biomodelling applications

By November 21, 2013Healthcare

The applications for 3D printing for home users and SMEs (Small and Medium Enterprises) are developing rapidly. Over the coming years devices like Robox will encourage users who aren’t engineers or 3D printing enthusiasts to create and manufacture useful objects.

As these excerpts from the article below show – biomodelling is a fantastic example of how a device like Robox can make a real difference to healthcare professionals in their daily work.  It would be great to hear from other healthcare professionals about other potential applications of this technology. Who knows – perhaps Robox can help!

“When Ms. S presented with a missing front tooth after a sport accident, she was concerned and anxious about the process of replacing it with a dental implant. There were many questions and unknowns about her condition. With an in-office Computed Tomography (CT) scanner, the clinical examination could be followed immediately by the 3D radiograph. Within minutes, we knew what bone anatomy was available, and could plan the surgery quickly. We could plan implant position and size using dedicated software. Yet, transposing planning to surgery remains a problem. Third party companies can fabricate a CAD/CAM surgical guide, using 3D printing. However, it takes about a week or more to obtain the guide. In addition, the process is complex: CT data needs to be uploaded, planning needs to be checked and approved, and guide providers often need to be mailed a plaster model for accuracy.”

“… in-office 3D printing is an opportunity to simplify and accelerate the process. At the moment, fabrication of biomodels is simple: CT data is segmented using simple software, and STL files are sent to the printer within minutes. Biomodels allow for visualization, manipulation and communication. Patients can better understand their condition, and general practitioners who are not surgeons can better communicate and coordinate care. If a change needs to be made, re-printing is simple and fast.”

See the full article at –

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/11/20/bringing-3d-printing-biomodels-house-aids-patient-care/

Image of 3D printed jawbone

 

Profile photo of Ian Hudson

About Ian Hudson

Ian is the lead software engineer for Robox software such as AutoMaker and other commissioning tools.

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