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Chris Elsworthy

AutoMaker 2.01.03 release and TechABS

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, News, Software Updates | 6 Comments

Hi Robox Users,

We’ve got some new features in AutoMaker to let you know about which are around making results match expectation and warning users when Robox cant continue. We’ve also release a new formula of ABS which is making it the material of choice for me right now.

AutoMaker Improvements

  • SurePrint enhancements
    • Off-bed model checks occur at project load time
    • Prints cannot be started if a model is off-bed
    • PLA is ejected if not required during a print with high bed temperatures
    • Bed temperature is lowered to PLA levels and raft is enabled if PLA and a different material are in use simultaneously
    • Improved post-processor and slicer failure indications

In previous versions the post processor was responsible for checking the sliced model to ensure that head movements were not beyond the ability of Robox, we now check the model before it is sliced to ensure it fits inside the build volume and thus wont generate moves that can’t be performed.

We’ve seen a few Dual Material users printing with PLA and and another materials that need higher temperatures at the same time, this has the potential to cause problems.  If the PLA filament gets too hot before it reaches the head it can jam the system, to overcome this and still allow these two materials to be printed together we’ve introduced some automated systems. Firstly, if the PLA was loaded but not used in the print we simply eject it just before the print to ensure it out of the build environment. If PLA is used for the build alongside another hotter material then AutoMaker now uses the PLA target temperature for both the bed and ambient, to ensure that the model sticks to the bed raft is automatically switched on.

AutoMaker check that the combination of the raft thickness and the models height to ensure it still fits into the build volume.

There are a number of checks that the post process does to the sliced model before allowing the print to start, if the print cant continue we now let the user know why whenever possible. This includes when the print exceeds the build volume due to switching on features like spiral printing and brim.

Without taking away options from users we hope that the above features will enable more prints to be successful and less chance of jamming or damaging your Robox.

Since the last release we noticed a few small issues which have also been addressed in this release;

  • Fixed macro selection issue – DM macro incorrectly selected in some situations when SM head mounted on dual-extruder printer.
  • Settings for Support, Raft, Brim now fit on the screen correctly
  • Bed axes move correctly when AutoMaker is resized
  • Calibration improvement – prevents apparent leak of nozzle when starting nozzle open calibration (only experienced by a minority of customers)
New materials – techABS
I’m very excited about this! ABS is the material of choice for many design engineers, its mechanical properties are well rounded and can have a mirror polish, it accepts a wide range of glues and paints as well as sanding and cutting nicely. Its a bit more difficult to print perfectly and warping and shrinkage have been a cause of pain on may prints. This new formula goes a good way to fix this, it prints at a slightly lower temperature and requires a cooler bed to stick down. A lower shrink rate along with these other properties means that parts print reliably, have good mechanical dimensions and have a beautiful surface finish.

Automaker 2.01.02 – New Feature! – Support Material Gap

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Materials, News, Software Updates | 6 Comments

As we start to key up CEL and Robox for dual material printing we have introduced a lot of new concepts. Most of our users will have seen some of these multi-material features creeping into AutoMaker over the most recent few releases. Today we’ve added another new feature with AutoMaker 2.01.02 Download here.

We think that one of the most useful features of multi-material printing is the ability to use one material for your part and the other as support structure. This means with the correct choice of material, support can be greatly improved. One of the Materials we been testing is PolyMaker’s PolySupport, we’ve found it to print well in a wide range of temperatures and have consistent structural and functional properties. PolySupport is designed to be a support material for PLA and we found that although its a PLA based material it delaminates easily from PLA and other materials making it very easy to remove. It has elastic and flexible properties which mean its a joy to peel from your model, infinitely easier than using any other Peel-able support material we’ve tested, in-fact its so good we’ve added a this new support gap option.

To further improve the support that an easily peel-able material can give your part we can remove the gap between the top and bottom surface, this gap was necessary when you needed to break-away support structures of the same material. We semi-automated this option, when AutoMaker sees that you are using a different material for support than the one chosen for your parts it will automatically deselect this option.

Support Gap OptionI hear some of you say “Why peel-able, why not focus on dissolvable support?”, well, we thought the same when we started to print with multiple materials but quickly discovered that dissolvable material solutions are messy, take a long time and are often difficult to process and store. Peel-able support can often be removed in a few minutes, where dissolvable support material can take hours if not days to disappear and often require some peeling as well. One thing you might have read about on the internet is the use of limonene to dissolve HIPS away from ABS prints, this is not a reality, after only a few tests we found that limonene does dissolve HIPS, but it also damages the ABS beyond usefulness. The other thing is that unless you LOVE the smell of oranges you quickly grow tired of all your parts, the office, your finger and pretty much everything you own having that pungent smell. Don’t misunderstand me, dissolvable materials will have their place, but for a large majority of support applications we feel easy peel-able is the way forward right now.

We’ve also exposed some of the controls around the generation of support structure to you so that you can tune your profiles to get more perfect parts.

Support Gap Options Profile

 

Version 2.01.02

  • Autoupdate now uses port 80 rather than port 8001
  • Added Support Gap function
    • This controls the vertical distance between the support material and model material which affects how easily support material can be removed
    • Disabled automatically if support material is different to model material (useful when using specialised peel-off support material)
    • Horizontal (Support XY Distance) and vertical (Support Z Distance) offsets are configured in the Print Profiles page
    • If Support Gap is enabled the system will introduce a vertical gap between support and model material
    • If Support Gap is disabled there will be no gap between support and model material
  • Improved filament saver function for dual material printing (automatic heater control during prints)
  • Grouped advanced mode controls onto an Advanced Mode menu on the Preferences page
  • Automatic selection of correct head type on profile page
  • Modified status display to make use of Material 1 and Material 2 clearer

When AutoMaker updates are available your system will usually find and offer an update automatically. If you are behind a firewall or some other system which prevents this, please visit www.cel-robox.com/downloads/ and download the most recent AutoMaker package.

AutoMaker sometimes needs to update the firmware on your printer. Please allow the firmware to update as requested by AutoMaker. If you do not allow the firmware update to take place, AutoMaker may not be able to communicate with your printer.

IMPORTANT NOTE: a firmware update will power cycle your printer so ensure no operations such as a print or calibration are running at the time of the firmware update.

Spiral Printing on Robox

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, Printables, Software Updates, Stuff and Things | 4 Comments

If you’ve downloaded the latest version of AutoMaker then you may have noticed that we’ve activated Spiral Printing for you to play with. Robox is particularly good at spiral printing as it offers the highest ranges of wall thickness without having to remove and replace the nozzle.

Below is a quick guide on how to best use this new feature.
There are a number of things that you should be aware of when trying this feature.

  1. Only place one object on the bed at any time.
    Because of the nature of spiral printing the flow of material from the nozzles does not stop and start. Placing more than one object on the bed means that the models would be impossible to print in one continuous extrusion.
  2. Ensure that your print has only one continuous island from bottom to top.
    This is for the same reason – multiple islands on any layer means that the flow of material has to stop and start. Spiral printing is designed to avoid this.
  3. Consider how thick you want the base to be
    This is one of the few controls Automaker has for spiral printing, the number of layers you choose and the layer thickness will equate to your base thickness before spiral printing starts. The first layer is always 0.3mm and as a guide I would ensure that this is the minimum filament width to ensure good adhesion to the bed. The sequence layers heights are controlled by, yes you’ve guessed it, ‘layer height’. So for example if you’ve chosen a layer height of 0.2mm and 5 base layers your spiral print with have a 1.1mm thick base. (0.3mm + (4 x 0.2mm))
  4. Think about what wall thickness you want
    After the base of your part is completed the system moves to the spiral printed section, continuously moving up as it orbits the perimeter of your design laying down a single line of filament. The wall thickness is controlled by the perimeter width and because its only going to be done in one pass you may want to increase it and use the larger 0.8mm nozzle to create wall thickness of up to 1.2mm. As a guide I’ve found that the ratio between layer height and wall thickness should be between 2:1 – 5:1, the thicker the wall and the smaller the layer height the more likely overhangs will be printed perfectly.
  5. The part must be solid, not hollowed out with a wall thickness
    Because we are using ‘Solid layers at Bottom’ and perimeter thickness to control the thickness of your part the part needs to be a solid to start with. If you want an inner and outer shell, and don’t mind a hollow centre you can use an idea I had when designing the is thermal mug: add a very thin cut down through the part to make each layer a single perimeter again. On the photo below, you can see that the sequence of printing is outside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> inside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> outside surface of the bowl… and so on…Thermal MugSpiral Mug Section Small
    6 . Your design is less than 99mm tall
    Robox has a 100mm Z-build height, but because of the way Cura adds the Z move to every move on the layer sometimes the sliced part will come out slightly above 100mm. The post processor will throw this out as impossible print, so to avoid this scale your part to ensure it is less than 99mm high.

Robox_spiral_cup_iso

You can download the cup above from this link. robox_spiral_mug.stl

Robox_spiral_lee_hand

Or the Vase with Support engineer Lee’s face on it by clicking the image above. LeeVase_Mk2.stl

WAREHOUSE OPERATIVE

By | Jobs board | No Comments

Warehouse Operative, Portishead. P/T or F/T considered

We are looking to recruit a Warehouse Operative who is keen to join our small but efficient team near Bristol, UK.

We design and manufacture electrical products. Import, export, warehousing and dispatch of these products is done via our Portishead warehouse and design office.
We are looking for an enthusiastic staff member to take control of our warehouse and manage the daily tasks required for incoming and outgoing stock. This role requires an organised mature approach to a range of tasks, experience is not essential but would be desirable.

A portion of your time each day will be spent servicing and repairing power tools for customers, this includes communicating with the customer directly via email, telephone and sometimes in person.

The successful applicant will be required to:

• Lift and move boxes throughout the day.
• Drive a forklift, training can be provided but experience is desirable.
• Use ladders and a simple computer system.
• Service, diagnose faults and maintain simple electrical and battery powered tools, training will be provided but basic knowledge of electrical or mechanical items will be very useful.

Essential skills:
• Communication
• Time management
• Record keeping

Main duties include:

• Picking & packing
• Unloading containers
• Stocktaking
• Franking post
• Servicing of power tools
• General cleaning

Part time and full time considered.
Permanent contract on successful completion of a 3 months probationary period
Monday – Friday
Salary negotiable according to experience

To apply please send a copy of your CV with a covering letter to collette@cel-uk.com

TOP 10 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

By | Design, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments
  1. Can I design things in AutoMaker ?

AutoMaker is our software for controlling the robox hardware; it allows you to send your design to the printer and set any parameters you need to get your design made. You can change the size, quality and strength of the print you’re about to start but currently you can’t design an object from scratch.  AutoMaker in also integrated with the world’s largest library of proven 3D printable designs – ‘My Mini Factory’.  You can download and place some of the millions of objects contained in the library and even customize some of them before printing in the material and colour of your choice.

  1. What will I print ?

Anything you want or desire!! I know, this doesn’t really help when you’ve been given a space age box of tricks. We would suggest browsing one of the online libraries to see what kind of things other people are printing – this can give you inspiration about how you can use your 3D printer to fix problems around the home, make toys, fashion items, decorations, replacement parts and so much more… 3D printed parts can be practical or just plain fun, the material is cheap so don’t be scared to have a play and print something just for fun.

  1. Where do I download things to print ?

There are lots of online libraries of parts to download and print, some these can be customized before you download them and all can be tweaked when you’ve got them. Our favourite repository is ‘My Mini Factory’ because they print all the items before uploading to make sure they are printable.  Not all libraries do this so there will be some downloads which aren’t specifically designed for 3D printing.

  1. What setup is required out of the box ?

To get 3D printing with Robox all you need to do is install the AutoMaker Software, unpack and connect the Robox to your PC and install the filament. Everything else will be done by the hardware itself. (a short video here)

  1. What ongoing maintenance is required ?

For normal users there is no maintenance other than keeping the Robox clean and tidy. For heavy users we include some high temperature oil that should be applied to the Y and X rails if the Robox makes an unusual noise while moving.

  1. How much does it cost to print ?

There is nearly no wastage when using Robox,  apart from a very small purge before a print, when swapping types of material and if you elected to use support material to make difficult shape objects. Cost is dependent on the type of material the Robox is consuming but typically it costs around £0.042 per gram and the cost of an object can be measured by the weight of material used. For example, a print case may use 18g of material so its cost to make is 18 x £0.042 = £0.77. The cost of electricity is less than a light bulb so even long prints will be extremely low cost. (all the different types of filament)

  1. Why do I need a 3D printer ?

If you are someone who enjoys making things rather than buying stock items, or if you want to find a solution for something you really need, 3D printing is for you. With a 3D printer you can easily realize all the designs you’ve been storing in your mind. Unlike all other skilled ways of making objects because the design is created on a computer using computer Aided Design(CAD) software you can improve your design every time you make it.  And unlike any other process, there are no additional costs involved so you can change and improve designs as many times as you want.

  1. What can a 3D printer make ?

You will often hear that “3D printers can make anything!!” and this is true, but the easiest things to print are those that have been designed for the process. Like any manufacturing technique the thing you want to make has to be designed in such a way as to take advantage of the process. There are things that 3D printers can make that some other manufacturing processes find impossible and there are aspects of designs that 3D printing struggles to do, with this in mind it’s important to understand the process so your designs aren’t restricted by your tools.  But to give some tangible examples of what desktop 3D printers can make, you could print door hinges and knobs, cutlery and cake cutters, pen pots and school homework accessories, bespoke decorative items for the house, gifts for loved one, the list is endless.

  1. What if the thing I want doesn’t fit onto Robox’s bed ?

You will be surprised what will fit into a Robox.  And most things around the house can fit into the palm of your hand, and will therefore fit onto the Robox bed.  A good way to find out what you can print inside a Robox is to make a cardboard box with the internal dimensions of 210 x 150 x 100mm.  Place any object you imagine you’d like to print into the box and you’ll discover that most things will fit.  If you do find something that won’t fit it’s very easy to cut the model into several parts and print each part next to each other or in separate jobs. Free software such as Microsoft Builder can easily cut up your models. We are soon going to include this function into our AutoMaker Software.

  1. Why isn’t it sticking to the bed ?

Prints that don’t stick to the bed are the most common reasons for failed prints. Even though we have a revolutionary ThermoSurface to remove the need for any preparation, if the head height isn’t calibrated correctly the type of bed surface can’t help. There are a few steps you can take to make sure your prints stick; use the supplied wipes to remove any finger prints or debris from the bed; ensure you head is calibrated; and the filament you are using is kept dry and in the sealed bag when not being used. If you still have trouble with first layer adhesion there are software options to increase the contact area of your part with the bed.  Brim, raft and support will add material to the first layer and thus improve adhesion. (more info. here)

Not the right order I’d say, but they are definitely the questions I get asked a lot…

Dual material Robox upgrades are close

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, Materials, News, Prototype Build, Software Updates | 28 Comments

It has been a little while since we last updated you on where we are with the dual material head, but I hope we can be forgiven for the lack of communication – especially as the real reason for this is that the entire CEL team have had their heads down testing the latest prototypes for faults, fact finding, and future proofing.

But we feel an update now is timely, as we are getting so close to being able to launch the new head to market; we really are almost at the end of what feels like a very long development journey.

RBX01-EX_2_EXTRUDERS_side

Software Update

RBX01-EX_2_EXTRUDERSSoftware is the biggest challenge as there really isn’t a good dual material system on the market to use as a template and both the slice engines we currently use aren’t able to deal with dual material prints in a consistent manner. This means we essentially had to start from scratch creating innovative software for this particular hardware development.

Before we get deep into the dual material system progress it’s worth mentioning what we’ve done to the software in preparation for this momentous task.

For the release of AutoMaker 1.02 we spent a good amount of time restructuring and developing the post processor.  We gained a much better understanding of where and how to open and close the needle valves, how to integrate the material the needle ejected into the model and how this is going to affect dual material printing.

For the upcoming version of AutoMaker we’ve actually recoded the post processor from scratch, our new level of understanding was restricted by our previous work. This updated thinking has gone into the current version of AutoMaker and is the backbone of dual-material capable AutoMaker version 2.

 

Right back to dual material and where we are now….

There are a lot of new requirements needed to take a multitude of models and turn them into a multi material print. We wanted the ability to take a 3D model, break it into individual parts and Dual Material AutoMakerallow the user to easily select which part was going to be assigned to which material.

Because most models which require multiple materials will need two or more separate parts, we wanted to add Group/Ungroup and model splitting. The Group/Ungroup and model splitting all have to be combined with the original transform functions so that we keep the parts’ relative position.

Dual Material AutoMaker bAfter we started to look closely at the model files  AutoMaker was expected to handle we found a very high percentage had imperfections – not normally a problem as the slice engines do some simple repair work – but a bigger problem if you’re trying to bisect the data and then add back in the missing vertexes, polylines and faces. We’ve not fully finished this aspect of the software and currently only warn users of the imperfection in the models that may cause problems later.

We now have a software tool that allows us to perform all of the above functions and it’s helping us finish the development of all the hardware.

The development of the software will continue up to and beyond the date you receive your new hardware, but for the first version of AutoMaker which is capable of doing dual material prints we have tried to keep the functionality to a minimum so that we can ensure stability.

 

RBX01-R2_adding_reel

Hardware Update

After a few false starts we’ve now got working dual material heads and an innovative second reel holder complete with reader. We are also taking a very close look at the management of the Bowden tubes and cables between the x-carriage and chassis.

RBX01-R2_LOADING_REEL

We were worried that the differing flexibility in filaments would affect the homing accuracy and thus distort the mapping of the bed giving poor first layers. We’ve made a fancy new cable chain to take the data and power cable and slightly constrained the Bowden tubes which now both reference the X-rails rather than the carriage.. (sorry if this is too geeky), basically we have more stuff to help improve probing and tidiness.

Another thing that only the people in the know would notice is that we have added a USB socket into the build chamber. It’s been there from the beginning – hidden away in the centre of the reel – but we’ve never got round to exposing it. We thought as we were designing a new PCB for the dual reel holder we would add the missing plug so you can start playing with it too.

The needle valve system has been extremely important in the quality of printing that Robox can achieve when talking about single material prints, removing all the stringing from one island to the next. When you use this innovative system with a dual material head it starts to become even more impressive.

All the dual material prints we’ve seen from other manufacturers have to include some sort of wipe tower, ooze screen, long cool down / heat up period, or purge sequence. None of this is necessary if your print head can stop the flow of material at its nozzle tip like the Robox can. Our very first print from the new system was one of the best we’ve seen. So now we’ve worked out how the system works, we’ve got working samples, and we are producing great print results.RBX01-DM_2HEADS_1OPEN

The final step is to ensure that all materials will flow through the new hardware smoothly, tidy-up the interface and test, test, test… I can’t tell you how big a chunk of work this last section is. We need to try every single combination of user input and output and not just once, on one machine. This needs hundreds of times on many printers by many different people to ensure that all the logic we’ve put into the software and hardware doesn’t crumble when given to a user who hasn’t been involved in the development.  With this in mind we’re now at the stage where we’re asking some of our customers who have placed pre-orders to beta test the first batch of hardware from the final production line.

So all in all, we’re really, really close.  If it sounds like we’re no further forward than last time – bearing in mind we finished our last update by saying we were “testing, testing, testing” – please be assured we are.  But after testing comes tweaking, and then more testing!

RBX01-DM_side_&USB_internal

RBX01-R2

So the final date is……???

We can’t say for sure, at the moment things are looking great and we hope to be able to launch the dual material head end of November, as per our last post.  If not then, early December.  But to reiterate the sentiments we made last time, we will only release the head if we’re confident it’s going to produce excellent results for everyone.

 

And lastly….

THANK YOU once again for your unwavering support, stick with us, as in just a couple of months the Robox 3D printer will make its mark as something completely different from anything else out there on the market – and we want you there with us to enjoy the ride.

RBX01-DM_internal_&cablechain

Oh you want a picture of a dual material print? Well….here is a sample of what we have to come.

dualmaterialprint_spiral_cone

Is Bigger Really Better?

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, News | 10 Comments

I hope to think so when it comes to engineers, as I’m 6’8″ tall!

But when it comes to 3D printers’ size really isn’t everything.

There are now two common selling points for those wanting to flog 3D printers – size / build volume and layer height.

And customers tend to assume they want the biggest unit possible, but want to print with the smallest layers possible, so let’s address these points below.

 

Build volume – The bigger the better?

After a pleasurable chat with one of our like-minded customers earlier this week we agreed on a number of misnomers, and they phrased one of them very concisely; “When shopping for a 3D printer customers often look for a spec. that will actually only fulfil 2% of their requirements, not the 98%”

I found this statement to ring very true, and build volume is a great example. Customers might occasionally want to print a large object that really does require a huge build volume, but 98% of the time the part they are printing will fit on a normal bed.

If you walk around the house and think of all the things you would probably want to print with your 3D printer – such as coat hooks, key fobs, door handles, light pulls, shelving brackets etc – you could probably fit each object in the palm of your hand, in which case, why do you need a build platform which is any bigger?

And yet still the natural first thought is to shop for a beast of a machine that is more expensive, ugly and domineering. Chances are the machine won’t fit on the desk, in the home or even at work, and 98% of the time won’t be used to it full advantage because there’s no need for such a huge space to print.

I’m not criticising as I’ve done it myself. After building my first 3D printer the next thing I did was build a much bigger one. And guess what? The big printer ended up printing parts that would have fitted on the first machine but just took longer to do and occupied more space in the office.

So to conclude, everyone might think they want a big one, they actually probably only need a small one!

Buddha_50mu_pencil_cu_2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Layer height – The smaller the better?

Marketing numbers, the driving force for many product design briefs, are used to sell printers and grab the customers’ attention, and we are as guilty of this as the next 3D printing specialist. We quote a minimum layer height of 20microns and we are not lying!

In contrast to build volume, in the case of microns, the common misconception is that the smaller the micron the better.

But would you ever want to print using a 20micron layer height? Maybe, but it’s not the first thing to consider when starting a FFF print job.

The obvious payoff is time, if you have a few days to spare and don’t need the printer for other jobs you can get amazing results by opting for a 20micron print. But whereas it will take double the time to produce a 20micron print over a 40, the quality won’t be twice as good.

In fact, below 50microns the improvements in quality are difficult to justify and I don’t know anyone who has enough time on their hands to be patient and wait to see the results.

Tying up your printer for hours on end is not the only sacrifice with low layer heights. Design and testing is an interactive process; print three or four items in the time it takes to do one and you will find that everyone you print is tweaked from the last and you end up with a better designed part over the same period of time – this is one of the real advantages with a desktop 3D printer.

When selecting a 3D printer I would look for range as well as minimum layer height. ‘Draft’ is more often used than ‘fine’ in our office when selecting a print profile and starting a print; we might print a part five times before we are happy with the design and only the last time do we select ‘fine’ quality. Because of the twin nozzle system the Robox can print from 20 – 700micron layers, which we believe is an industry best (small boast there!)

 

In summary 3D printing is about gaining the ability to manufacture parts to your requirements on your desktop.

Most people don’t yet have this ability and it’s what 3D printing can do for you. Think about what you’re really going to make and where you would like to use your printer and select a product that fits that brief. For 99% of people, including me, ease of use, reliability and having something close to hand are the top 3 requirements, while print quality, features, future proof design and compactness follow closely behind.

We design products that we want personally, of course we have to sell them and play the same game as every other retailer or design house, but most of our design briefs are driven by personal desire. As with everyone we like to think that our requirements are not uncommon and so far feedback seems to support this.

Kickstarter Training Day

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Kickstarter, News | One Comment

Friday (26th August) was a special day for us here at CEL, as a few of us had the privilege of meeting with the select people from our Kickstarter campaign who bid on the ‘Robox® 3D Printing Starter Pack’, which included a visit to meet us in Bristol, UK and the opportunity to own an early Limited Edition Robox® in the Kickstarter colours, as well as a day’s training. Oh, and lunch as well.

Excitingly the day went pretty much to plan, with only one slight change in the lead up to the event as we realised that with an office and warehouse move, perhaps a visit to HQ wasn’t the brightest of ideas. So a quick change of venue later, and we found ourselves in a dust-free, rubbish-free, clean and tidy office just around the corner.

Our backers brought their own laptop computers with them, and much of the day was spent unpacking the brand new Rob units – the only ones in the world with limited edition plaques – installing the software and testing the prints. Happily, all of the Robox units worked well and it was amazing to actually see the reactions of people as they got to grips with the new technology. The fact they were printing pretty quickly after discarding the packaging was very reassuring.

c1

c2

It was also really great to spend the day with some like-minded people…. These are the guys who understand or love 3D printing so much they’ve waited patiently for the best part of a year to receive the unit they truly believe will be the difference within the 3D printing industry.

But contrary to our expectations, a real mix of people attended the day – it wasn’t just geeky tech-types who know everything about additive manufacturing; normal people attended too! We were pleased to meet home users, retailers, engineers, and even children – all of whom managed to get their machines up and running quickly despite having no previous experience. Our aim with the Robox project has always been to make 3D printing accessible to everyone, and the training day proved this is really possible.

We all got a real buzz from the day, and are now making plans to run similar training days in the future, so watch this space!

 

Transformers: 3D printed robots in the skies…

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog | No Comments

We love reading about the latest trends for 3D printing, as companies strive to invent the coolest gadgets to take the media world by storm.

These stories are brilliant for illustrating just how versatile 3D printing can be, and allow readers to use their own imaginations and dream up their own innovative designs.

Some of the most impressive 3D printed parts have to be the prosthetic limbs which have benefited people all over the world, and even 3D printed human tissue.  Scientists one day hope to be able to create human organs on a 3D printer, and while developments towards this are being made daily, we’re probably a couple of decades away from seeing a 3D printed organ appearing in a hospital operating theatre.

The team at Robox are passionate about 3D printing being used for worthwhile causes, and will soon hope to be instrumental in making human hands along with The Open Hand Project leader Joel Gibbard … watch this space for more info.

amsterdam chair

Other great achievements have been 3D printed furniture which allows homeowners to create a unique living space, 3D printed cars, innovative rocket designs, hand washing devices to solve hygiene problems in Lebanon, hats and clothing, and even story books.

The most recent news comes from BAE scientists who have announced that in 2040 we may see Transformer-style 3D printer drones flying through the skies, after researchers have spent time designing and researching futuristic aircraft technologies.

Read more about developments these experts believe could take place in just 26 years time:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/06/3d-printer-drones-2040-bae-futurist-aircraft

We at Robox certainly love Transformers, so the thought of being able to print and send mini unmanned aircraft into the stratosphere sounds great!