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Grant Mackenzie

Robox in East Ayrshire Primary Schools

By | Education | No Comments

“I selected Robox 3D printers to go into all our Primary schools after extensive research. The locking door ensures that the printing area is a safe environment and hands cannot make contact with hot components, the ease of printing and easy removal of the printed models are very user friendly.”

Martyn Hendry
STEM Coordinator
East Ayrshire Council

Dual extrusion 3D printing

By | Education, Stuff and Things | No Comments

Coinciding with the glowing RoboxDual review (click here to read) published recently by All3DP, RoboxDual is fast becoming the leading dual extrusion 3D printer in schools, colleges and universities.

Whether it’s in a leading university like Imperial College London, where they’re using more Robox and RoboxDual 3D printers in their new 3D printing lab than any other model including MakerBot, LulzBot, BCN or Ultimaker, or the scores of primary schools in Scotland where Robox is the 3D printer of choice in a number of council-wide digital learning schemes, the award-winning Robox platform is offering new opportunities to enhance STEM learning as the safest and easiest to use 3D printer for all stages of education.

For a start, RoboxDual represents incredibly good value for money at £1,499 when compared to its closest competitors, Ultimaker 3 and BCN Sigma, which retail for £3,354 and £2,263 respectively. Indeed, many in the industry have commented on the poor value for money Ultimaker 3 represents, especially when you consider the fact that dual extruder prints on Ultimaker’s most advanced 3D printer now take double, triple or even quadruple the time to complete (I’m not exaggerating – read a review here). Ultimaker 3 is almost twice the price of its predecessor but it’s clear from the reviews it’s received since launching that it’s far from twice the value. Reviewers also point to the Ultimaker design starting to look quite dated now.

How much longer do dual extruder prints take to complete on RoboxDual? Well, this is where our patented needle valve flow control technology comes into its own. Single and dual extruder print times are virtually identical on RoboxDual thanks to these needle valves (click here for more info on this critical tech). I’d highly recommend you compare the elegant nozzle changing mechanism of RoboxDual with the clunky and time-wasting mechanism adopted by Ultimaker to get an idea of how valuable these needle valves are. You can watch a great video of RoboxDual in action on our last Kickstarter page.

It’s also worth mentioning that Ultimaker 3 does not support a 0.8 mm nozzle whereas RoboxDual is compatible with the Robox QuickFill head, which includes both a 0.8 mm and 0.3 mm nozzle. In fact, RoboxDual comes with the dual material head (2 x 0.4 mm nozzles) and QuickFill single material head as standard in the box.

In terms of speed, aesthetics and certainly value for money, RoboxDual wins hands down, every time.

Take a look at the new Robox Education page on our website where you can read reviews and testimonials, download literature and watch a great new video we’ve put together:

Robox, the #1 3D printer for education

By | Education | No Comments
 

Blackfield Primary School

Year 6 pupils use Robox to learn about insect anatomy.

 

St Andrew's Primary School

East Ayrshire's STEM Coordinator, Martyn Hendry, takes Year 5 pupils through designing custom name tags using Autodesk's free, browser-based Tinkercad software.

 

Working in partnership with the James Dyson Foundation

Gears are 3D printed on Robox in a Year 10 James Dyson Foundation project.

 

Aiding inclusive design

A Year 11 student demonstrates her GCSE James Dyson Foundation project aimed at aiding people who experience difficulty grasping objects.

 

Complexity made simple

Robox now supports both single and dual extruders with its new dual material upgrade module, allowing even more complex geometries to be printed with ease.

 

Inspiring a new generation

A Year 4 class in Blackfield Primary School uses Tinkercad and Robox to create stationery organisers for a school project.

 

Mendip Studio School

Year 11 students discuss their GCSE projects.

 

Ashlyns School

A student upgrades his A-Level project with Robox.

 

Safety and Security

Robox is the only 3D printer with an interlocking safety door to prevent accidental injury.

 

FAWE School, Rwanda

Students from Writhlington School provide 3D printer workshops to Rwandan students.

The safest and easiest to use 3D printer for education, Robox delivers professional results with an award-winning user experience.

  • Needle valves ensure only desired material is printed with no need to retract or wipe nozzles
  • Hassle-free build plate with no glue, toxic sprays or tape required
  • Only desktop 3D printer with an interlocking safety door
  • Rapid head (<1 min) and bed (<4 mins) heat-up times
  • Compatible with 3rd party filament – no vendor lock-in
  • Automatic material recognition with no setup required
  • Fully automatic bed levelling and easy calibration

“If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.”
ALL3DP.com

“Features like automatic bed leveling, easy-to-use software, filament auto-load, and SmartReel filament technology made setup a breeze and very beginner friendly.”
Make Magazine 3D Printer Guide 2017

“I selected Robox 3D printers to go into all our Primary schools after extensive research. The locking door ensures that the printing area is a safe environment and hands cannot make contact with hot components. The ease of printing and easy removal of the printed models are very user friendly.“
Martyn Hendry, STEM Coordinator, East Ayrshire Council

“We assessed Robox against a number of other popular 3D printers and it came out on top in terms of portability, ease of use, safety, design and print quality.”
Scottish Library & Information Council

New Robox Kickstarter Project Launch Today

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, News | No Comments

Kickstarter offers early access to exciting new Robox tech to improve 3D printing workflow and productivity

 

We’re excited to announce the launch of a brand new Robox Kickstarter campaign today, Wednesday 11th January, centred around three new accessories: Root, Tree and Mote.

 

Why are we developing these new accessories?

 

Wireless access and control devices have been common feature requests since Robox launched in late 2014. In fact we hinted at control devices for Robox as part of our first Kickstarter campaign but deliberately chose not to include control hardware and a user interface built into Robox hardware to prevent that hardware from limiting the potential of the basic functions of Robox’s XYZ motion frame.

By keeping control hardware separate, we’re able to alter and improve it without disrupting that simple and robust system. This separation helps to reduce cost, keeps development simple and fast, and allows great flexibility.

Robox’s AutoMaker software can already be used to connect multiple Robox units to a single computer via USB, but with the Root update users will now be able to connect to multiple Robox units remotely opening up new opportunities for productivity.

 

What are Root, Mote and Tree exactly?

 

Root is a small device which, when connected to Robox, allows control and monitoring of prints via a wired or wireless network. Root also includes a web service which can be accessed via a mobile device.

In a business environment, or where there are multiple Robox units available, these new systems will make prototyping and development much more efficient. Root will allow designers to connect remotely to multiple 3D printers, empowering them to be more creative and progress through design iterations faster. Each Robox connected to Root can be visible to others on the network, so an office full of individually controlled printers is also a networked print farm.

Tree is a compact furniture system to house multiple Robox units in a small footprint and improve productivity though enhanced workflow and throughput. This configuration of 3D printers running in parallel allows Robox to outperform larger, more expensive systems in terms of speed and reduces the risk of total part failure with RAID-like redundancy. Tree utilises Robox’s compact form factor to deliver maximum efficiency. Printers working in this parallel configuration means much faster printing while also adding redundancy and increased flexibility. Choosing Robox keeps cost low and productivity high.

The final piece of this system is a simple, dedicated, low cost, touchscreen interface for Root. We call this Mote and it can be integrated into the Tree hardware to act as a control panel.

Together, these three new Robox accessories will allow Robox users to share hardware more conveniently and carry out multiple jobs faster with increased reliability.

Visit the Kickstarter campaign page for the full story with graphics and photos:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/robox/root-tree-and-mote-for-robox-micro-manufacturing-p

 

Partnerships to strengthen the campaign

 

We’re partnering with local makers and services globally to produce and distribute Root, Tree and Mote. We’re also partnering with global electronic parts supplier RS Components and 3D printer material specialist Polymaker to ensure the best quality components for these new accessories.

Using Polymaker’s innovative new PolySmooth materials and PolySher product in the production of the Root accessory, we will be using Robox to produce production-grade parts from our UK head office. And with RS Components providing the hardware for all of these new accessories, users can feel supremely confident in their finished quality.

 

RS Components is the trading brand of Electrocomponents plc, the global distributor for engineers. With operations in 32 countries, RS offers more than 500,000 products through the internet, catalogues and at trade counters to over one million customers, shipping more than 44,000 parcels a day. RS products, sourced from 2,500 leading suppliers, include electronic components, electrical, automation and control, and test and measurement equipment, and engineering tools and consumables.

RS Components has also created an online community for engineers, DesignSpark, which is a repository of free tools and technical resources to help designers to make those big ideas happen. The community has already assisted a few tech start-ups like PiTop to quickly bring their ideas to prototype and proof of concept.  In addition to using the suite of free professional CAD packages, the RS DesignSpark community gives start-ups access to thousands of technical articles, including reference designs and product reviews.

 

Polymaker is a company committed to innovation, quality and sustainability in the pursuit of producing safe and clean materials for the 3D printing industry.

With an eight-step quality control process, Polymaker’s filaments are not only guaranteed to have the best quality standards but also provide innovative properties that help yield a better overall printing experience, ensuring the efficiency of 3D printers and empowering consumers to create strong, functional 3D printed products. With a rapidly growing portfolio of materials, Polymaker will continue to bring new performance enhanced materials to the 3D printing community.

 

Why should you pledge?

 

This Kickstarter campaign offers an opportunity for you to gain early access to new technology that’ll improve your productivity and 3D printing experience. You’ll be joining a community of backers able to offer direct feedback to us and help steer the direction of this technology’s development. You’ll also be gaining access to all of these new technologies at a huge cash discount!

Our last Kickstarter campaign was a huge success and we hope you can help us make this one a success too. Even if you don’t back us, you can help spread the word by sharing news of the campaign with your friends. After all, it’s 3D printing we’re talking about! Who won’t be interested?

 

3D printing a stress-free Xmas

By | Design, Stuff and Things | No Comments

No Christmas is complete without a mad dash for presents in the final few days. If you’re like me and have left shopping to the last minute, there’s really no alternative to an exhilarating, stressful day of retail shopping to guarantee you can deliver on the big day itself.

But this doesn’t have to be the story. In fact, why buy presents at all? If you have a 3D printer, why aren’t you making them? You don’t need to design your own presents. That’s far too much effort in the run-up to Christmas. Instead, you can download any number of free gifts from online libraries like MyMiniFactory or Thingiverse. You can even personalise the models you download with free software such as Microsoft’s 3D Builder to make your gift even more personal.

The gift you make doesn’t even have to be good. The fact that it’s been 3D printed will be enough to blow the recipient away. And isn’t it the thought that counts anyway?

If you own a 3D printer, let it help you de-stress your Christmas and save a packet in the process. 3D printing your own gifts is fun and extremely cost-effective. What kind of bracelet could you buy for 47p?

xmas-2016And if you don’t own a 3D printer, perhaps you should consider making one of your New Year’s resolutions to involve yourself in this exciting, liberating technology. Robox recently won 3D Hub’s award for best “Plug ‘N’ Play” 3D printer in the world for the 2nd year running. Anyone can become a maker, especially with Robox.

Robox is the 3D printer of choice in libraries

By | Libraries, News | No Comments
 

Rebecca Gunn, Children and Families Development Officer for East Dunbartonshire Leisure and Culture Trust, works with a 3D printer in the William Patrick Library in Kirkintilloch, Scotland.

 

The Scottish Library & Information Council's 3D printing project is in collaboration with the BBC's Make It Digital initiative.

 

Taunton Library offers an open and friendly community space to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds

     Copyright 2016 Scottish Library & Information Council
 

What is the purpose of a library? Although the answer may seem obvious, consider the fact that many people had their first experience of the Internet in a library. Today, with computers and free Wi-Fi coming as standard in most public libraries, they have evolved to become much more than buildings containing collections of books.

Public libraries are the most popular civic resource that local government offers. They are now community centres where people can connect not only with authors but with each other and the wider world. It is in this community spirit that a growing number of libraries are beginning to offer public access to cutting-edge 3D printing technology.

The case for inclusion of 3D printing technology in libraries is compelling. Whether we’ll all have 3D printers in our homes in the future is up for debate, but there is certainly no question that 3D printing will play a much greater role in our day-to-day lives in the years ahead. Products are being developed and even manufactured in ever increasing numbers with 3D printing technologies. Individuals are now running their own businesses armed with Robox to design and manufacture custom, bespoke products (Chompworks is a great example). Children are being taught in a growing number of primary and secondary schools with 3D printers to help inspire design creativity and improve student engagement (Robox is also the #1 choice in schools). With ready, free access to computers and the Internet, libraries are surely the best places to provide wider public access to this game-changing technology.

Providing access to 3D printing technology is also a fantastic way to get people through the door and excite the younger generation. And once engaged, people will get to see some of the other new and exciting services being offered by many libraries. Public libraries in Scotland are already offering services such as coding clubs for 9-11-year-olds and innovative projects in England such as Glass Box in Taunton Library are offering open and friendly community spaces to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds. 3D printers could also act as an additional revenue stream for libraries in the future to support the costs of consumables. (Robox advises how much a print job will cost before printing.)

Scots know a good thing when they see it

I’ve written previously about Robox being part of a UK-first 3D printing programme in primary schools across the country. Now I have the pleasure to report that, after careful consideration by the Scottish Library & Information Council (SLIC) detailed in their report, 3D Printing in Scottish Public Libraries, Robox has been selected for rollout in Scottish libraries too.

After some positive early 3D printing experiences in a small number of libraries, SLIC made a successful bid to the Scottish Government in 2015 to expand and develop this growing area of interest and skills development. SLIC’s £76,000 3D printing project is now being rolled out across Scotland to all library services to improve access to this exciting new technology and encourage creativity in communities.

The inclusion of 3D printing activities is helping libraries in Scotland support the recommendations in a report commissioned by the Scottish Government in their vision for public libraries, Ambition and Opportunity, A Strategy for Public Libraries in Scotland 2015-2020, in a number of key areas:

Each library service has appointed a 3D Printing Champion to promote and support 3D printing activities and develop bespoke projects within their local communities. Feedback on the projects has been overwhelmingly positive so far. Such activities fit with SLIC’s vision for libraries in the 21st Century and help ensure they remain exceptional value for money, where every £1 of public money invested in libraries generates up to £8 of benefits to the communities they serve:

Realising Ambition & Opportunity – Celebrating One Year of Achievements from SLIC on Vimeo.

Pamela Tulloch, Chief Executive of SLIC comments: “I believe 3D printing in public libraries offers huge potential for local communities to learn and create.  Thanks to additional funding from the Scottish Government, more people will have access to this exciting technology. Who knows what it might lead to in some communities – the possibilities are endless and ground-breaking ideas can come from the most unexpected places.

“This is just one of the innovative projects underway in libraries across Scotland to meet the aims of the public library strategy, which we launched last year.  A key aspect of the strategy is to ensure libraries reflect the needs of modern communities. The 3D printing project is an excellent demonstration of the ability of libraries to adapt to the changing needs of communities, ensuring they remain relevant in an increasingly digital world.”

I’ll be delivering a 3D printing workshop in Taunton Library on 28th October between 2pm and 5pm when I’ll be offering a demonstration of free design tools and Robox itself. If you’d like to see 3D printing in action at the Glass Box, get in touch and come along!

TechSoft: “an amazing machine for such a low cost”

By | Education, News | No Comments

We’re very pleased to see leading education specialist TechSoft promote Robox as its No.1 choice of 3D printer for schools in their 2016-2017 Product Guide.

TechSoft was founded in the mid-1980s and soon established itself as a market-leading supplier of CAD and CAD/CAM systems. The TechSoft team have gained great insights into the technology needs and requirements of education in the years since and began supplying 3D printers to schools in 2004.

All of TechSoft’s sales and support staff are either ex-Design and Technology teachers, graduates in Design and related fields or qualified engineers. This means that they not only have a wealth of practical understanding but also understand the subject-specific issues teachers face on a daily basis.

TechSoft’s experience of low-cost 3D printers over the years allows the team to conclude that Robox “stands out from the crowd for accuracy, reliability, cost-effectiveness, ease of use and safety”. We couldn’t agree more. Thank you, TechSoft!

05TechSoft
03TechSoft
04TechSoft

Why Robox is making such an impact in education

By | Education, News | No Comments
 

Blackfield Primary School

Year 6 pupils use Robox to learn about insect anatomy.

 

St Andrew's Primary School

East Ayrshire's STEM Coordinator, Martyn Hendry, takes Year 5 pupils through designing custom name tags using Autodesk's free, browser-based Tinkercad software.

 

Working in partnership with the James Dyson Foundation

Gears are 3D printed on Robox in a Year 10 James Dyson Foundation project.

 

Aiding inclusive design

A Year 11 student demonstrates her GCSE James Dyson Foundation project aimed at aiding people who experience difficulty grasping objects.

 

Complexity made simple

Robox now supports both single and dual extruders with its new dual material upgrade module, allowing even more complex geometries to be printed with ease.

 

Inspiring a new generation

A Year 4 class in Blackfield Primary School uses Tinkercad and Robox to create stationery organisers for a school project.

 

Mendip Studio School

Year 11 students discuss their GCSE projects.

 

Ashlyns School

A student upgrades his A-Level project with Robox.

 

Safety and Security

Robox is the only 3D printer with an interlocking safety door to prevent accidental injury.

 

FAWE School, Rwanda

Students from Writhlington School provide 3D printer workshops to Rwandan students.

When I first used a 3D printer in 2005, Stratasys and 3D Systems were the only players in town and the costs of their systems were truly eye-watering. The Stratasys Dimension BST we used then cost over £19,000 and reels of filament over £200 each.

In the decade since, key 3D printing patents held by those once pioneering manufacturers have expired and the open source RepRap project has triggered a wave of desktop 3D printer innovations. The cost of 3D printing technologies has now plummeted (Robox costs less than £1,000 with reels of filament under £30 each) at the same time as we’ve seen significant advances in speed and capabilities – thanks also in part to the recent proliferation of very high quality, but totally free, 3D modelling tools. The technology has become much simpler, more affordable and therefore more accessible to everyone.

3D printers are fast becoming staples of secondary school D&T departments. Our work with the James Dyson Foundation is seeing us develop some truly exciting and innovative STEM programmes aimed at encouraging students and teachers to use 3D printers and inspiring them to think creatively about design and technology. While our work has initially focused on programmes in secondary schools, our efforts to help stimulate young people are now leading us to help develop new programmes with partner schools at even earlier stages in the education curriculum.

One exciting programme is being pioneered by Josh Rigby, D&T Leader at Blackfield Primary School, part of the Inspire Learning Federation. His Year 6 ‘Lift Off’ project is now in its second year and engages pupils to develop and build remote controlled hovercraft. They use Robox and free 3D modelling tools from Autodesk such as Tinkercad and 123D Design to customise their hovercrafts for identified target audiences.

Pupils at Blackfield Primary School use Tinkercad to create custom parts for their hovercrafts.

 
Another project he leads, titled ‘Dyson Design,’ engages Year 4 pupils in the design of modern desktop equipment for the classroom of the future. The project helps 8-year-old pupils get to grips with technical drawings and requires them to consider a range of materials for their designs, which are then developed in Tinkercad.

We’re also helping to introduce 3D printing to a pioneering, ambitious education project targeting primary age children in Scotland. Martyn Hendry, STEM Co-ordinator in East Ayrshire Council, has just completed a Robox pilot programme in a number of primary schools in his authority to see how 3D printers can be introduced into the curriculum. Working with projects he’s developed to inspire creative thinking, and supported by entrepreneurs and people from industry, teachers have reported a very enthusiastic response from pupils. One school has even broadened the project to the Primary 2 year group of 6-year-olds.

Malachy Ryan, from engineering consultancy Alan White Design, demonstrates design innovations to pupils at St Andrews Primary School as part of the DYW programme.

 
Martyn is helping to ensure Robox plays its part in the Scottish government’s youth employment strategy, Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) – a seven-year programme that aims to better prepare children and young people from 3-18 for the world of work. The success of the Robox pilot programme and Scottish government programmes such as DYW herald the beginning of a much more ambitious rollout of 3D printers to schools and organisations in the region.

Dumfries House Education, a cluster of six bespoke training centres situated in the stunning 18th century Ayrshire Dumfries House estate, is one such organisation using Robox to help deliver experiential, hands-on activities for young people. The centres offer a selection of education and training programmes designed to support learners in Primary and Secondary education with the Engineering Education Centre’s aim being to excite young people about science and technology. Dumfries House Education grew from HRH the Prince of Wales’ desire to see young people engage in learning experiences that promote confidence, personal development and offer training in real life skills. Their inspirational workshops are available to schools, youth groups and local authorities in the region and Martyn is actively involved helping to integrate 3D printing into their programmes.

Robox is providing schools with a more cost-effective, straightforward option to bring 3D printing to classrooms and workshops around the UK. As a British 3D printer manufacturer making the world’s only desktop 3D printer with an interlocking safety door, we are uniquely placed to work with the James Dyson Foundation and schools across the country to help improve learning outcomes and empower teachers and schoolchildren to invent, to think creatively about design and technology and not be afraid to make mistakes. Martyn Hendry reports how 3D printers and computer-aided design (CAD) software have helped children as young as 9 understand mathematical concepts such as negative numbers: “There was just no justification for using CAD without a 3D printer. 3D printers embed the technical drawing while the teaching and learning is embedded in the use of CAD.”

For more information about what we’re doing, read a previous article here or contact me directly using the links below.

CEL Robox, “a workshop in a box”

By | Education | No Comments

“Robox is an amazing tool for learning. In my studies, it has allowed me to bring my ideas and concepts into the physical world. Producing something traditionally which is as complex or intricate as what can be produced using a 3D printer, would require years of training on professional tools or be impossible to be produced as a single object. This obviously would be an impossibility for a student who wants to envision their ideas into reality. As a student myself, I do not have the skills or knowledge to use high level manufacturing equipment, but have unique ideas. By removing the complexities of the production process, it allows multiple ideas to be produced with ease.

“The innovative design of the Robox 3D printer allows easy to load materials, again, reducing the complexity of the production process. Its simple UI offers ease of use to both new and experienced users with the advanced functionality. My favourite feature is the heated bed, this allows printing to start up almost immediately, and not require bed preparation; which is the case for many 3D printers.

“Robox allows people like myself, to be able to envision our ideas, and make them reality. By having physical objects, we learn from mistakes in design, and gain a more practised knowledge of design. Robox is essentially a workshop in a box.”

Writhlington-SchoolJames Stewart
Student
Writhlington School