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CEL RoboxDual 3D Printer Review: Dual Extrusion Redefined

By | News, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

A glowing and very detailed review of RoboxDual from All3DP.com – All about 3D printing.

Images from All3Dp.com

Alastair Jennings from All3Dp.com writes:

early comparisons against the UM3 show that the RoboxDual’s dual extrusion system is far quicker.

The quotes keep coming, we read the comprehensive review with glee!

If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.

Quality-wise, single extrusion prints are as good as you can get from a fused filament fabrication (FFF) printer, and ABS print quality is almost identical to that of the Ultimaker 3. Dual extrusion prints are equally impressive, mixing materials and colors well.

Filament from any manufacturer can be fed into Robox, either directly from the source reel or wound onto a SmartReel with a custom profile written to the EEPROM memory on the reel. This gets around the initial worry that you’ll be locked to high priced filaments and any limitations of range.

If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.

Unlike many competitors such as Lulzbot and Ultimaker, CEL have from the outset aimed to create a printer that could be used by anyone safely and without the need to tinker. The Lulzbots and Ultimakers are fantastic class-leading machines, but the RoboxDual offers something a little more refined.

For this reason the RoboxDual is a very different machine from others in its class, as it utilises custom electronics, extruders and hot-ends. These components aren’t designed to be tinkered with, which makes that RoboxDual one of the few printers out there that really should find wide appeal in workplaces and schools rather than just the maker community.

Ultimaker, Lulzbot and Makerbot might be better known brands, and there’s no doubting their abilities and quality when it comes to printing. But the RoboxDual and Robox have both been designed as a usable mainstream printer, much in the same way as any 2D printer of old.

From the outset, everything about the CEL RoboxDual shows that this is the work of engineers rather than hobbyists, with a set of design and development features that are not slapdash but carefully considered.

What did they think about the price?

Why block up one large printer when you can print on multiple? The downside is of course the cost; more printers means a greater outlay, but then the Ultimaker 3 is more than double the price.

The filament is also provided by some of the best known filament providers in the world, including ColorFabb and PolyMaker, and there’s a good selection available. If you want to use your own filament then you can, either by feeding it in and telling the software which filament profile to use, or by loading it onto an empty SmartReel and updating the circuit info through the AutoMaker software. The system is open and easy to experiment with.

In a busy design technology classroom, the noise from the RoboxDual at full print speed is unnoticeable, and even when printing in the office the noise is perfectly bearable.

Print extraction from the platform is the fight that folks least enjoy about 3D printing, whether that’s trying to extract a model from the perforated base of the Zortrax M200, lever a print from the glass base of the Ultimaker 2, or dunk a resin-coated masterpiece from a Form 2. With the RoboxDual (RBX02), however, is a print platform that we can learn to get along with.

Stop! You are embarrassing us…

It’s been designed by engineers as a tool, something to be used on a daily basis without issue. In those terms we would say that this is the first 3D printer that truly mimics the ideology of a standard paper printer. It sits there in the corner of the room and prints without any fiddling or calibration, it just gets on with it.

As innovations go, the RoboxDual is packed with features that constantly reveal themselves the more you delve into settings and options.

Dual extrusion 3D printers are becoming more prevalent, and the market in this sector is rapidly expanding. At this point in time, the RoboxDual offers a printer that is cost effective, reliable, and offers great quality beyond any other dual extrusion printer on the market at this price.

Factor in the pricing, innovation and future modular expandability, and it’s difficult not to recommend the RoboxDual.

Running Man!

Kickstarter launch of Root, Tree and Mote is now live!

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Kickstarter, News, Prototype Build | No Comments

For the next 30 days we ask that everyone shares our project with as many people as possible. These new tools, particularly Root, make the use of Robox even easier and more flexible.

Root™ adds network access to Robox. The way this has been implemented can allow a huge range of web based tools to provide alerts, control and much more. Put Root in your garage and connect up to 9 Robox units to it or share multiple Robox so your colleagues can also use these resourses. You will still control Robox via AutoMaker in the same way, loading models, choosing settings and pressing Make! The slicing will happen locally on your powerful system, the sliced code is sent to the selected Robox via Root. AutoMaker will find and allow connection to any Root devices on a local network and any Robox which is directly connected to that computer.

Root can run on a lot of hardware, we have designed it to run on a Raspberry Pi 3. Our partners RS Components are supplying hardware packages for the pledges which include hardware to keep cost as low as possible and supply certain. The case for Root is by Robox designer Chris Elsworthy and will be printed on Robox using materials from our other partner in this campaign, Polymaker. We intend to print the cases using their Polysmooth material which can be smoothed using their Polysher IPA print smoothing system.

Tree is a racking system for Robox. There are 3 shelf and 5 shelf systems which are available in raw Birch ply or Laminated Black ply. These have a small footprint for desktop of floor setup and allow full access to Robox while keeping everything neat and tidy. Root can be mounted to Tree to provide control and network sharing of attached Robox units.

Mote is a simple touchscreen interface for Root. You can control Root via AutoMaker, your smartphone or tablet. We found that having a dedicated control device ready and waiting right next to the printers allowed us to work more efficiently. This was particularly useful in our office where several printers are shared for when the printers on each persons desk are busy.

Please share this project with anyone interesting 3D printing, considering a purchase or who perhaps decided not to buy Robox because it did not have wifi.

Learn how to Fabricate an In-Office 3D Printed Surgical Guide for $20 with a $1500 3D printer with free software.

By | Education, Healthcare | 3 Comments

Presented by: Dr. Rick Ferguson

Date: Saturday, January 28th, 2017
Time: 8:00AM-6:30PM
Tuition: $1095. Optional Second Day $500 – Fabricate a guide for your own case.
CE: 8 Hours

Location: Porsche West Broward
4641 SW 148th Ave
Davie, FL 3331

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

Rick Ferguson lectures throughout the world on a variety of implant surgery and restorative topics. He is the Director of Implant Educators which runs a seven month program teaching general dentists and specialists how to become implantologists. Dr. Ferguson is a Diplomate of the ICOI, an Associate Fellow of the AAID, clinical assistant professor at the University of Florida and a visiting lecturer at the University of Miami. Dr. Ferguson has taught implant dentistry and hands-on bone grafting courses which have been attended by thousands of dentists over the last 18 years. He is currently in private practice in Davie, Florida.

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

DENTAL SCHOOL OFFER: Free Surgical Guide Exports. Print Surgical Guides on Campus.

By | Education, Healthcare | 2 Comments

Blue Sky Plan has become the favoured surgical planning tool for dental work. The software lets you work and plan your cases for free and has an excellent selection of tools to allow accurate matching of scan inputs and implant hardware plus the ability to create digital surgical guides. The software is constantly evolving to keep up with the advances in dental technology and improving methods.

If you are an educator in dentistry you probably already know all this. Take advantage of the offer below to allow your students to work all the way though the export phase of case planning. Grab a Robox and print your surgical guides accurately, incredibly cheaply and without any fuss in house.

blueskyplanfreeexporteducation

Tiny Timbot!

By | Design, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

I wanted to post up some feedback from a Robox user and share some of the amazing work he has been doing to make robots imitate life.

Jason from Mechanimal emailed us this very watchable robot.

Not only is he walking, he’s using his arms to help balance, like he should, and he’s using his tiny little eyes to detect obstacles. That’s no wind up toy, that there is an autonomous robot, tiny baby version.

It has 8 independently controlled servo motors, an IR sensor for eyes, 2 microphones, a speaker, and all of the control circuits are in it’s wee little head. A total of 18 pieces in two colors, all from my Robox, and he stands but a few inches tall. Not bad for my first project using the Robox, super excited to make more complex parts with the new dual material head.

And a HUGE thanks once again, this is the machine I’ve been waiting 15+ years for.

 

Check out some of Jason’s other work, Tiny Timbot will lead you into a whole world of mechanical animals. You can even get involved by becoming a patron here.

Circuit Specialists get a Dual Material Head upgrade and talk to Ben Hudson about Robox

By | Robox User Blog | No Comments

If you head West from the CEL office on the West coast of UK, across the North Atlantic and drop South a little you will hit the East Coast of USA. Travel further West through many of the states which form the US until you find Tempe, Arizona. If you reach the West coast you have gone too far. Tempe is home to Circuit Specialists; a retail store offering just about every thing you could need to build, maintain and test electronic devices. These guys know their stuff having sold semiconductors and the like for over 35 years.

Recently they had a visit from Bed Hudson who works for CEL to maintain Robox units for our US customers. Ben installed one of our new Dual Material Kits into one of the stores demonstration machines. They made some very informative videos about their experiences and had a long chat with Ben. You can check this out in their blog via the link below.

www.circuitspecialists.com/blog/robox-dual-material-head/

Dr. Cory Glenn’s Implant Pearls and Products

By | Healthcare | No Comments

Based on Cory Glenn’s Dental Town Post ‘Cory Glenn’s Implant Pearls and Products‘.

If you have a Dental Town login you can see the discussion here: Dental Town Message Board

  • CBCT planning and guided surgery will save you money by decreasing the time needed for surgery, making your surgeries more precise, decreasing the need for lots of inventory, and making your restorative costs more predictable.
  • CBCT planning and guided surgery will make you more money through increased case acceptance, more referrals, giving you confidence to tackle more cases, and by helping determine which cases will be complicated and/or less profitable

Dr Glenn writes:

Which Implants To Use

Everyone’s titanium integrates……. some just integrate much cheaper!

  • Use a value branded implants with a good track record like Blue Sky Bio (my favorite)
  • Use a conical connection with a platform switch
  • Use implants with aggressive threading

Reduce Your Risks:  Failures are the Kiss of Death

  • Flap everything you can and bury the implants with primary closure in a 2 stage approach.
  • Flap rather than punch at uncover to gain keratinized gingival by rolling it to the buccal
  • Avoid immediate placement until you’re very experienced.  I suggest grafting all sites with                 Maxxues 50:50 Mineralized/Demineralized FDBA ($51 for 0.5cc) mixed with Fusion Bone Binder (Woodland Hills Pharmacy) and covered with a collaplug in single rooted teeth or a Cytoplast TXT-200 Nonresorbable membranes ($40) in molar sockets
  • Stick with shorter implants (8 and 10mm lengths).  There’s almost no value in a longer implant unless primary stability is of the utmost importance (ie immediate and single staged implants which you’re not going to do…… right!?
  • Stay 2-3 mm from anything with a name (inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, etc)

Tips to do More Implants

  • Learn to do conservative crestal sinus lifts. 30% of all potential implant sites you encounter will need a sinus bump or a sinus lift.
  • Buy a CBCT.  Having to refer out for scans creates a much bigger barrier than you realize.  Most dentists find that the number of implants they do doubles once they get CBCT in office.
  • Plan cases in front of the patient.  The purpose is twofold:  you will be able to confidently tell them whether you can do the case and what it will cost right then and there.  It also creates a significant “wow factor” when your patients see you using this level of technology and planning.
  • Lower your prices.  Price is your gas pedal.  If you want to do more, step on the gas and lower fees.  A routine single tooth placed guided takes me an average of 2 hours total time and 3 appointments from start to finish.  Even by charging a bundle fee of $2500, you’ll still generate over $1,000 an hour.
  • Offer in house financing:  Implants are perfect for financing since they won’t get the final product for several months after starting the process.  Not staying current with payments? No implant crown for you!
  • New to Blue Sky Bio?  Listen to this webinar to learn more about the company, the owners, and their products. http://www.blueskybio.academy/public/New-to-BlueSkyBio.cfm

Recommended Product List for Guided Surgery

Read Full Post on Dental Town Including:

3d Printers… 
3d Printing Labs…
What you will need to get started…
Much More
.

Dental Town Message Board

Print a Popup Poldark

By | Printables | No Comments

Click the download button to make your own Popup Poldark to fit official Tomy Pop Up Pirate games.

The file is RoboxDual compatible, just drag the 3 .stl files into AutoMaker at the same time and select materials by double clicking on the group to select each part. If you have a single material printer the objects will print as a group.

Please note that Tomy and CEL advise not to insert anything except the original parts into the spring loaded device for safety reasons. 3D printed parts are not intended for children who may choke on small items.

SLA vs FFF / FDM workflow and space requirements

By | Education, Healthcare, Materials, News | No Comments

SLA (Stereolithography ) is often compared to the FFF (Fused Filament Fabrication) / FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling) process of 3D printing and always shows very impressive results. The detail level is far superior for SLA but there are a lot of complications to the process. Due to the huge numbers of dentists, dental labs and orthodontists contacting us recently I thought I would share some of what I have learned.

The most common comparison is the strength of the parts created from resin vs those created with fused filament which always comes out on top. Next are the many resin handling issues which make filament printers much easier and safer to use.

It is easy to discount FFF/FDM completely by just looking at pictures of the excellent smoothness of an SLA print vs an FDM print. The SLA process can create a smoother and more detailed surface finish and and can create a fully solid, partially transparent part which is difficult to achieve on FFF /FDM machines without post processing. This makes it harder for those of us demonstrating fused filament fabrication printers to keep a viewers attention.

To someone viewing the printed results of 2 models side by side it would be hard to choose the FFF / FDM print if visual quality or surface detail was the goal. In a comparison of useability which requires strength, the FFF /FDM print is far more likely to come out on top particularly due to the huge selection of material types available. The SLA materials tend to be closely linked to specific printers, it is unlikely a 3rd party resin will be allowed or compatible. This limits the SLA user to the resins developed by that manufacturer. In a comparison of workflow the SLA process is quite scary, warning labels and notes on resin handling and cleanup dominate but the consumption of core components of the SLA printer along with litres at a time of IPA (Isopropyl alcohol) and the expensive resin is certainly worth exploring before any decision is made to exclude filament printing. The accuracy of the two methods should theoretically be the same but I have yet to see an SLA print which has been perfectly dimensionally accurate while my Robox is within 0.01mm in all axes without my input all day every day. Cost comparisons are far further apart than the price of the printers would suggest. SLA resin cost is high, plastic filament cost is low. This expensive resin is wasted with every print, plastic filament is only extruded as required. This cost in particular is not shown in “part cost comparisons”, nor is the very wasteful rinsing in IPA to remove excess resin following a print or the cost of the consumable resin carrying and curing parts, or the disposal and storage as well as low shelf life for expensive SLA resins. Oh and the space required for SLA printing is rarely mentioned, you really need a spare room and some strict policies to control the spread of sticky resin the smell and the harm to the environment.

Click the image to make it bigger.

In the chart below I’ve listed some positives and negatives of each method along with typical usage and costs. Blue indicates the best in my opinion for each row. I obviously support filament printers in this, perhaps your comments can sway my opinion?

FDM SLA
Limited detail, high accuracy, layer lines visible High detail and accuracy, layer lines hard to see in some cases
Parts and excess material can be disposed of in regular waste Resin waste and printed parts require special disposal. H413: May cause long-lasting harmful effects to aquatic life
No material wasted except with support creation, no mess Wasted resin is washed away in IPA and disposed of regularly in build tank, sticky residue from resin spreads around work area and is hard to clean. Disposal of cleaning products restricted
No use by date on filament with low cost 12 month shelf life and high cost
Material is inert and harmless before and after printing Requires special handling equipment
Can be used in any work area Requires special work area
Materials are widely available and cross compatible Only specified resins can be used with most SLA printers
Minimal requirements for storage of material Requires special storage conditions for resins and required cleaning chemicals in large quantities
No additional equipment Cleaning baths, UV Light booth, safety, storage and disposal equipment
Minimal space required to function Considerable space requirement to keep several large pieces of equipment away from other equipment and work areas
Range of materials in many colours and with a huge range of mechanical properties Very limited range of materials, locked to manufacturer
Opaque parts unless post processed Optical clarity in some materials
Material dependant useable indefinitely  Low shelf life of parts due to UV exposure
Low cost of consumable parts High cost of consumable parts
Material cost is low $25 per kg Material cost is high $99 per kg + processing and waste!
Medium flexural strength  (material relevant to medical use) Low flexural strength (material relevant to medical use)
Low upfront equipment cost High upfront equipment cost, printer and additional equipment
Potential for dual material with dissolvable or peel away support Single material with mechanical removal of support
System allows dual material for overmolded parts and pause features for inserting captive objects No system for inserted or overmolded parts
No training required for use or handling High level of materials handling trainingrequired

 

My conclusion is this:

SLA is not a threat to FFF / FDM printing, if anything the 2 methods can work side by side as their benefits do not overlap. Personally I would not let the resin (or the smell of it) near my home or my family but if I had a dedicated space within a business and the training and staff to run this then I would consider SLA as an addition to several far lower priced FFF /FDM printers. I could print many iterations of a design on the filament printers and perhaps a surface model on the SLA machine once the design was final, actually it might be best to just outsource that part…

SLA should remain in the hands of professional labs or dedicated service providers, FFF /FDM is for everyone. In fact with the low cost of filament printers, every designer should have one on their desk.