Kickstarter launch of Root, Tree and Mote is now live!

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Kickstarter, News, Prototype Build | No Comments

For the next 30 days we ask that everyone shares our project with as many people as possible. These new tools, particularly Root, make the use of Robox even easier and more flexible.

Root™ adds network access to Robox. The way this has been implemented can allow a huge range of web based tools to provide alerts, control and much more. Put Root in your garage and connect up to 9 Robox units to it or share multiple Robox so your colleagues can also use these resourses. You will still control Robox via AutoMaker in the same way, loading models, choosing settings and pressing Make! The slicing will happen locally on your powerful system, the sliced code is sent to the selected Robox via Root. AutoMaker will find and allow connection to any Root devices on a local network and any Robox which is directly connected to that computer.

Root can run on a lot of hardware, we have designed it to run on a Raspberry Pi 3. Our partners RS Components are supplying hardware packages for the pledges which include hardware to keep cost as low as possible and supply certain. The case for Root is by Robox designer Chris Elsworthy and will be printed on Robox using materials from our other partner in this campaign, Polymaker. We intend to print the cases using their Polysmooth material which can be smoothed using their Polysher IPA print smoothing system.

Tree is a racking system for Robox. There are 3 shelf and 5 shelf systems which are available in raw Birch ply or Laminated Black ply. These have a small footprint for desktop of floor setup and allow full access to Robox while keeping everything neat and tidy. Root can be mounted to Tree to provide control and network sharing of attached Robox units.

Mote is a simple touchscreen interface for Root. You can control Root via AutoMaker, your smartphone or tablet. We found that having a dedicated control device ready and waiting right next to the printers allowed us to work more efficiently. This was particularly useful in our office where several printers are shared for when the printers on each persons desk are busy.

Please share this project with anyone interesting 3D printing, considering a purchase or who perhaps decided not to buy Robox because it did not have wifi.

New Robox Kickstarter Project Launch Today

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, News | No Comments

Kickstarter offers early access to exciting new Robox tech to improve 3D printing workflow and productivity

 

We’re excited to announce the launch of a brand new Robox Kickstarter campaign today, Wednesday 11th January, centred around three new accessories: Root, Tree and Mote.

 

Why are we developing these new accessories?

 

Wireless access and control devices have been common feature requests since Robox launched in late 2014. In fact we hinted at control devices for Robox as part of our first Kickstarter campaign but deliberately chose not to include control hardware and a user interface built into Robox hardware to prevent that hardware from limiting the potential of the basic functions of Robox’s XYZ motion frame.

By keeping control hardware separate, we’re able to alter and improve it without disrupting that simple and robust system. This separation helps to reduce cost, keeps development simple and fast, and allows great flexibility.

Robox’s AutoMaker software can already be used to connect multiple Robox units to a single computer via USB, but with the Root update users will now be able to connect to multiple Robox units remotely opening up new opportunities for productivity.

 

What are Root, Mote and Tree exactly?

 

Root is a small device which, when connected to Robox, allows control and monitoring of prints via a wired or wireless network. Root also includes a web service which can be accessed via a mobile device.

In a business environment, or where there are multiple Robox units available, these new systems will make prototyping and development much more efficient. Root will allow designers to connect remotely to multiple 3D printers, empowering them to be more creative and progress through design iterations faster. Each Robox connected to Root can be visible to others on the network, so an office full of individually controlled printers is also a networked print farm.

Tree is a compact furniture system to house multiple Robox units in a small footprint and improve productivity though enhanced workflow and throughput. This configuration of 3D printers running in parallel allows Robox to outperform larger, more expensive systems in terms of speed and reduces the risk of total part failure with RAID-like redundancy. Tree utilises Robox’s compact form factor to deliver maximum efficiency. Printers working in this parallel configuration means much faster printing while also adding redundancy and increased flexibility. Choosing Robox keeps cost low and productivity high.

The final piece of this system is a simple, dedicated, low cost, touchscreen interface for Root. We call this Mote and it can be integrated into the Tree hardware to act as a control panel.

Together, these three new Robox accessories will allow Robox users to share hardware more conveniently and carry out multiple jobs faster with increased reliability.

Visit the Kickstarter campaign page for the full story with graphics and photos:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/robox/root-tree-and-mote-for-robox-micro-manufacturing-p

 

Partnerships to strengthen the campaign

 

We’re partnering with local makers and services globally to produce and distribute Root, Tree and Mote. We’re also partnering with global electronic parts supplier RS Components and 3D printer material specialist Polymaker to ensure the best quality components for these new accessories.

Using Polymaker’s innovative new PolySmooth materials and PolySher product in the production of the Root accessory, we will be using Robox to produce production-grade parts from our UK head office. And with RS Components providing the hardware for all of these new accessories, users can feel supremely confident in their finished quality.

 

RS Components is the trading brand of Electrocomponents plc, the global distributor for engineers. With operations in 32 countries, RS offers more than 500,000 products through the internet, catalogues and at trade counters to over one million customers, shipping more than 44,000 parcels a day. RS products, sourced from 2,500 leading suppliers, include electronic components, electrical, automation and control, and test and measurement equipment, and engineering tools and consumables.

RS Components has also created an online community for engineers, DesignSpark, which is a repository of free tools and technical resources to help designers to make those big ideas happen. The community has already assisted a few tech start-ups like PiTop to quickly bring their ideas to prototype and proof of concept.  In addition to using the suite of free professional CAD packages, the RS DesignSpark community gives start-ups access to thousands of technical articles, including reference designs and product reviews.

 

Polymaker is a company committed to innovation, quality and sustainability in the pursuit of producing safe and clean materials for the 3D printing industry.

With an eight-step quality control process, Polymaker’s filaments are not only guaranteed to have the best quality standards but also provide innovative properties that help yield a better overall printing experience, ensuring the efficiency of 3D printers and empowering consumers to create strong, functional 3D printed products. With a rapidly growing portfolio of materials, Polymaker will continue to bring new performance enhanced materials to the 3D printing community.

 

Why should you pledge?

 

This Kickstarter campaign offers an opportunity for you to gain early access to new technology that’ll improve your productivity and 3D printing experience. You’ll be joining a community of backers able to offer direct feedback to us and help steer the direction of this technology’s development. You’ll also be gaining access to all of these new technologies at a huge cash discount!

Our last Kickstarter campaign was a huge success and we hope you can help us make this one a success too. Even if you don’t back us, you can help spread the word by sharing news of the campaign with your friends. After all, it’s 3D printing we’re talking about! Who won’t be interested?

 

3D printing a stress-free Xmas

By | Design, Stuff and Things | No Comments

No Christmas is complete without a mad dash for presents in the final few days. If you’re like me and have left shopping to the last minute, there’s really no alternative to an exhilarating, stressful day of retail shopping to guarantee you can deliver on the big day itself.

But this doesn’t have to be the story. In fact, why buy presents at all? If you have a 3D printer, why aren’t you making them? You don’t need to design your own presents. That’s far too much effort in the run-up to Christmas. Instead, you can download any number of free gifts from online libraries like MyMiniFactory or Thingiverse. You can even personalise the models you download with free software such as Microsoft’s 3D Builder to make your gift even more personal.

The gift you make doesn’t even have to be good. The fact that it’s been 3D printed will be enough to blow the recipient away. And isn’t it the thought that counts anyway?

If you own a 3D printer, let it help you de-stress your Christmas and save a packet in the process. 3D printing your own gifts is fun and extremely cost-effective. What kind of bracelet could you buy for 47p?

xmas-2016And if you don’t own a 3D printer, perhaps you should consider making one of your New Year’s resolutions to involve yourself in this exciting, liberating technology. Robox recently won 3D Hub’s award for best “Plug ‘N’ Play” 3D printer in the world for the 2nd year running. Anyone can become a maker, especially with Robox.

Learn how to Fabricate an In-Office 3D Printed Surgical Guide for $20 with a $1500 3D printer with free software.

By | Education, Healthcare | 3 Comments

Presented by: Dr. Rick Ferguson

Date: Saturday, January 28th, 2017
Time: 8:00AM-6:30PM
Tuition: $1095. Optional Second Day $500 – Fabricate a guide for your own case.
CE: 8 Hours

Location: Porsche West Broward
4641 SW 148th Ave
Davie, FL 3331

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

Rick Ferguson lectures throughout the world on a variety of implant surgery and restorative topics. He is the Director of Implant Educators which runs a seven month program teaching general dentists and specialists how to become implantologists. Dr. Ferguson is a Diplomate of the ICOI, an Associate Fellow of the AAID, clinical assistant professor at the University of Florida and a visiting lecturer at the University of Miami. Dr. Ferguson has taught implant dentistry and hands-on bone grafting courses which have been attended by thousands of dentists over the last 18 years. He is currently in private practice in Davie, Florida.

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

e-NABLE – the most inspiring 3D print project I’ve seen

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Education, Printables | 3 Comments

I was recently introduced to the e-NABLE project by our friends André and Guillaume at Le Comptoir 3D

This is an awesome venture that aims to get functional 3D printed hands to people around the world.  Heard this before? Well e-NABLE takes a different approach… Anyone with a 3D printer can make a difference thanks to the network of e-NABLE volunteers around the world.

These hands don’t replace expensive, highly functional natural looking prosthetic hands – but they’re not meant to. Children who have limb differences can’t always get prostheses (partly because they’re growing) so these hands can make a real and immediate difference to their lives.

Take a look at this video from e-NABLE to see what I mean.

Now tell me you don’t want to use your Robox to make a difference.

Visit http://enablingthefuture.org/ for more information on how to help.

And if you’re a student or teacher reading this then please take a look at http://www.handchallenge.com/ and involve your school in this amazing project.

The story of e-NABLE is inspiring – you can be part of it too.

Here’s my first print of a Raptor hand produced on a Robox – I’ll add more pictures when it’s assembled.

Raptor 3D printed prosthetic hand

Thanks for reading!

Ian

 

DENTAL SCHOOL OFFER: Free Surgical Guide Exports. Print Surgical Guides on Campus.

By | Education, Healthcare | 2 Comments

Blue Sky Plan has become the favoured surgical planning tool for dental work. The software lets you work and plan your cases for free and has an excellent selection of tools to allow accurate matching of scan inputs and implant hardware plus the ability to create digital surgical guides. The software is constantly evolving to keep up with the advances in dental technology and improving methods.

If you are an educator in dentistry you probably already know all this. Take advantage of the offer below to allow your students to work all the way though the export phase of case planning. Grab a Robox and print your surgical guides accurately, incredibly cheaply and without any fuss in house.

blueskyplanfreeexporteducation

Robox is the 3D printer of choice in libraries

By | Libraries, News | No Comments
 

Rebecca Gunn, Children and Families Development Officer for East Dunbartonshire Leisure and Culture Trust, works with a 3D printer in the William Patrick Library in Kirkintilloch, Scotland.

 

The Scottish Library & Information Council's 3D printing project is in collaboration with the BBC's Make It Digital initiative.

 

Taunton Library offers an open and friendly community space to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds

     Copyright 2016 Scottish Library & Information Council
 

What is the purpose of a library? Although the answer may seem obvious, consider the fact that many people had their first experience of the Internet in a library. Today, with computers and free Wi-Fi coming as standard in most public libraries, they have evolved to become much more than buildings containing collections of books.

Public libraries are the most popular civic resource that local government offers. They are now community centres where people can connect not only with authors but with each other and the wider world. It is in this community spirit that a growing number of libraries are beginning to offer public access to cutting-edge 3D printing technology.

The case for inclusion of 3D printing technology in libraries is compelling. Whether we’ll all have 3D printers in our homes in the future is up for debate, but there is certainly no question that 3D printing will play a much greater role in our day-to-day lives in the years ahead. Products are being developed and even manufactured in ever increasing numbers with 3D printing technologies. Individuals are now running their own businesses armed with Robox to design and manufacture custom, bespoke products (Chompworks is a great example). Children are being taught in a growing number of primary and secondary schools with 3D printers to help inspire design creativity and improve student engagement (Robox is also the #1 choice in schools). With ready, free access to computers and the Internet, libraries are surely the best places to provide wider public access to this game-changing technology.

Providing access to 3D printing technology is also a fantastic way to get people through the door and excite the younger generation. And once engaged, people will get to see some of the other new and exciting services being offered by many libraries. Public libraries in Scotland are already offering services such as coding clubs for 9-11-year-olds and innovative projects in England such as Glass Box in Taunton Library are offering open and friendly community spaces to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds. 3D printers could also act as an additional revenue stream for libraries in the future to support the costs of consumables. (Robox advises how much a print job will cost before printing.)

Scots know a good thing when they see it

I’ve written previously about Robox being part of a UK-first 3D printing programme in primary schools across the country. Now I have the pleasure to report that, after careful consideration by the Scottish Library & Information Council (SLIC) detailed in their report, 3D Printing in Scottish Public Libraries, Robox has been selected for rollout in Scottish libraries too.

After some positive early 3D printing experiences in a small number of libraries, SLIC made a successful bid to the Scottish Government in 2015 to expand and develop this growing area of interest and skills development. SLIC’s £76,000 3D printing project is now being rolled out across Scotland to all library services to improve access to this exciting new technology and encourage creativity in communities.

The inclusion of 3D printing activities is helping libraries in Scotland support the recommendations in a report commissioned by the Scottish Government in their vision for public libraries, Ambition and Opportunity, A Strategy for Public Libraries in Scotland 2015-2020, in a number of key areas:

Each library service has appointed a 3D Printing Champion to promote and support 3D printing activities and develop bespoke projects within their local communities. Feedback on the projects has been overwhelmingly positive so far. Such activities fit with SLIC’s vision for libraries in the 21st Century and help ensure they remain exceptional value for money, where every £1 of public money invested in libraries generates up to £8 of benefits to the communities they serve:

Realising Ambition & Opportunity – Celebrating One Year of Achievements from SLIC on Vimeo.

Pamela Tulloch, Chief Executive of SLIC comments: “I believe 3D printing in public libraries offers huge potential for local communities to learn and create.  Thanks to additional funding from the Scottish Government, more people will have access to this exciting technology. Who knows what it might lead to in some communities – the possibilities are endless and ground-breaking ideas can come from the most unexpected places.

“This is just one of the innovative projects underway in libraries across Scotland to meet the aims of the public library strategy, which we launched last year.  A key aspect of the strategy is to ensure libraries reflect the needs of modern communities. The 3D printing project is an excellent demonstration of the ability of libraries to adapt to the changing needs of communities, ensuring they remain relevant in an increasingly digital world.”

I’ll be delivering a 3D printing workshop in Taunton Library on 28th October between 2pm and 5pm when I’ll be offering a demonstration of free design tools and Robox itself. If you’d like to see 3D printing in action at the Glass Box, get in touch and come along!

Tiny Timbot!

By | Design, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

I wanted to post up some feedback from a Robox user and share some of the amazing work he has been doing to make robots imitate life.

Jason from Mechanimal emailed us this very watchable robot.

Not only is he walking, he’s using his arms to help balance, like he should, and he’s using his tiny little eyes to detect obstacles. That’s no wind up toy, that there is an autonomous robot, tiny baby version.

It has 8 independently controlled servo motors, an IR sensor for eyes, 2 microphones, a speaker, and all of the control circuits are in it’s wee little head. A total of 18 pieces in two colors, all from my Robox, and he stands but a few inches tall. Not bad for my first project using the Robox, super excited to make more complex parts with the new dual material head.

And a HUGE thanks once again, this is the machine I’ve been waiting 15+ years for.

 

Check out some of Jason’s other work, Tiny Timbot will lead you into a whole world of mechanical animals. You can even get involved by becoming a patron here.

Circuit Specialists get a Dual Material Head upgrade and talk to Ben Hudson about Robox

By | Robox User Blog | No Comments

If you head West from the CEL office on the West coast of UK, across the North Atlantic and drop South a little you will hit the East Coast of USA. Travel further West through many of the states which form the US until you find Tempe, Arizona. If you reach the West coast you have gone too far. Tempe is home to Circuit Specialists; a retail store offering just about every thing you could need to build, maintain and test electronic devices. These guys know their stuff having sold semiconductors and the like for over 35 years.

Recently they had a visit from Bed Hudson who works for CEL to maintain Robox units for our US customers. Ben installed one of our new Dual Material Kits into one of the stores demonstration machines. They made some very informative videos about their experiences and had a long chat with Ben. You can check this out in their blog via the link below.

www.circuitspecialists.com/blog/robox-dual-material-head/