3D printing a stress-free Xmas

By | Design, Stuff and Things | No Comments

No Christmas is complete without a mad dash for presents in the final few days. If you’re like me and have left shopping to the last minute, there’s really no alternative to an exhilarating, stressful day of retail shopping to guarantee you can deliver on the big day itself.

But this doesn’t have to be the story. In fact, why buy presents at all? If you have a 3D printer, why aren’t you making them? You don’t need to design your own presents. That’s far too much effort in the run-up to Christmas. Instead, you can download any number of free gifts from online libraries like MyMiniFactory or Thingiverse. You can even personalise the models you download with free software such as Microsoft’s 3D Builder to make your gift even more personal.

The gift you make doesn’t even have to be good. The fact that it’s been 3D printed will be enough to blow the recipient away. And isn’t it the thought that counts anyway?

If you own a 3D printer, let it help you de-stress your Christmas and save a packet in the process. 3D printing your own gifts is fun and extremely cost-effective. What kind of bracelet could you buy for 47p?

xmas-2016And if you don’t own a 3D printer, perhaps you should consider making one of your New Year’s resolutions to involve yourself in this exciting, liberating technology. Robox recently won 3D Hub’s award for best “Plug ‘N’ Play” 3D printer in the world for the 2nd year running. Anyone can become a maker, especially with Robox.

Learn how to Fabricate an In-Office 3D Printed Surgical Guide for $20 with a $1500 3D printer with free software.

By | Education, Healthcare | 3 Comments

Presented by: Dr. Rick Ferguson

Date: Saturday, January 28th, 2017
Time: 8:00AM-6:30PM
Tuition: $1095. Optional Second Day $500 – Fabricate a guide for your own case.
CE: 8 Hours

Location: Porsche West Broward
4641 SW 148th Ave
Davie, FL 3331

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

Rick Ferguson lectures throughout the world on a variety of implant surgery and restorative topics. He is the Director of Implant Educators which runs a seven month program teaching general dentists and specialists how to become implantologists. Dr. Ferguson is a Diplomate of the ICOI, an Associate Fellow of the AAID, clinical assistant professor at the University of Florida and a visiting lecturer at the University of Miami. Dr. Ferguson has taught implant dentistry and hands-on bone grafting courses which have been attended by thousands of dentists over the last 18 years. He is currently in private practice in Davie, Florida.

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

e-NABLE – the most inspiring 3D print project I’ve seen

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Education, Printables | 3 Comments

I was recently introduced to the e-NABLE project by our friends André and Guillaume at Le Comptoir 3D

This is an awesome venture that aims to get functional 3D printed hands to people around the world.  Heard this before? Well e-NABLE takes a different approach… Anyone with a 3D printer can make a difference thanks to the network of e-NABLE volunteers around the world.

These hands don’t replace expensive, highly functional natural looking prosthetic hands – but they’re not meant to. Children who have limb differences can’t always get prostheses (partly because they’re growing) so these hands can make a real and immediate difference to their lives.

Take a look at this video from e-NABLE to see what I mean.

Now tell me you don’t want to use your Robox to make a difference.

Visit http://enablingthefuture.org/ for more information on how to help.

And if you’re a student or teacher reading this then please take a look at http://www.handchallenge.com/ and involve your school in this amazing project.

The story of e-NABLE is inspiring – you can be part of it too.

Here’s my first print of a Raptor hand produced on a Robox – I’ll add more pictures when it’s assembled.

Raptor 3D printed prosthetic hand

Thanks for reading!

Ian

 

DENTAL SCHOOL OFFER: Free Surgical Guide Exports. Print Surgical Guides on Campus.

By | Education, Healthcare | 2 Comments

Blue Sky Plan has become the favoured surgical planning tool for dental work. The software lets you work and plan your cases for free and has an excellent selection of tools to allow accurate matching of scan inputs and implant hardware plus the ability to create digital surgical guides. The software is constantly evolving to keep up with the advances in dental technology and improving methods.

If you are an educator in dentistry you probably already know all this. Take advantage of the offer below to allow your students to work all the way though the export phase of case planning. Grab a Robox and print your surgical guides accurately, incredibly cheaply and without any fuss in house.

blueskyplanfreeexporteducation

Robox is the 3D printer of choice in libraries

By | Libraries, News | No Comments
 

Rebecca Gunn, Children and Families Development Officer for East Dunbartonshire Leisure and Culture Trust, works with a 3D printer in the William Patrick Library in Kirkintilloch, Scotland.

 

The Scottish Library & Information Council's 3D printing project is in collaboration with the BBC's Make It Digital initiative.

 

Taunton Library offers an open and friendly community space to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds

     Copyright 2016 Scottish Library & Information Council
 

What is the purpose of a library? Although the answer may seem obvious, consider the fact that many people had their first experience of the Internet in a library. Today, with computers and free Wi-Fi coming as standard in most public libraries, they have evolved to become much more than buildings containing collections of books.

Public libraries are the most popular civic resource that local government offers. They are now community centres where people can connect not only with authors but with each other and the wider world. It is in this community spirit that a growing number of libraries are beginning to offer public access to cutting-edge 3D printing technology.

The case for inclusion of 3D printing technology in libraries is compelling. Whether we’ll all have 3D printers in our homes in the future is up for debate, but there is certainly no question that 3D printing will play a much greater role in our day-to-day lives in the years ahead. Products are being developed and even manufactured in ever increasing numbers with 3D printing technologies. Individuals are now running their own businesses armed with Robox to design and manufacture custom, bespoke products (Chompworks is a great example). Children are being taught in a growing number of primary and secondary schools with 3D printers to help inspire design creativity and improve student engagement (Robox is also the #1 choice in schools). With ready, free access to computers and the Internet, libraries are surely the best places to provide wider public access to this game-changing technology.

Providing access to 3D printing technology is also a fantastic way to get people through the door and excite the younger generation. And once engaged, people will get to see some of the other new and exciting services being offered by many libraries. Public libraries in Scotland are already offering services such as coding clubs for 9-11-year-olds and innovative projects in England such as Glass Box in Taunton Library are offering open and friendly community spaces to support budding entrepreneurs, small businesses and creative minds. 3D printers could also act as an additional revenue stream for libraries in the future to support the costs of consumables. (Robox advises how much a print job will cost before printing.)

Scots know a good thing when they see it

I’ve written previously about Robox being part of a UK-first 3D printing programme in primary schools across the country. Now I have the pleasure to report that, after careful consideration by the Scottish Library & Information Council (SLIC) detailed in their report, 3D Printing in Scottish Public Libraries, Robox has been selected for rollout in Scottish libraries too.

After some positive early 3D printing experiences in a small number of libraries, SLIC made a successful bid to the Scottish Government in 2015 to expand and develop this growing area of interest and skills development. SLIC’s £76,000 3D printing project is now being rolled out across Scotland to all library services to improve access to this exciting new technology and encourage creativity in communities.

The inclusion of 3D printing activities is helping libraries in Scotland support the recommendations in a report commissioned by the Scottish Government in their vision for public libraries, Ambition and Opportunity, A Strategy for Public Libraries in Scotland 2015-2020, in a number of key areas:

Each library service has appointed a 3D Printing Champion to promote and support 3D printing activities and develop bespoke projects within their local communities. Feedback on the projects has been overwhelmingly positive so far. Such activities fit with SLIC’s vision for libraries in the 21st Century and help ensure they remain exceptional value for money, where every £1 of public money invested in libraries generates up to £8 of benefits to the communities they serve:

Realising Ambition & Opportunity – Celebrating One Year of Achievements from SLIC on Vimeo.

Pamela Tulloch, Chief Executive of SLIC comments: “I believe 3D printing in public libraries offers huge potential for local communities to learn and create.  Thanks to additional funding from the Scottish Government, more people will have access to this exciting technology. Who knows what it might lead to in some communities – the possibilities are endless and ground-breaking ideas can come from the most unexpected places.

“This is just one of the innovative projects underway in libraries across Scotland to meet the aims of the public library strategy, which we launched last year.  A key aspect of the strategy is to ensure libraries reflect the needs of modern communities. The 3D printing project is an excellent demonstration of the ability of libraries to adapt to the changing needs of communities, ensuring they remain relevant in an increasingly digital world.”

I’ll be delivering a 3D printing workshop in Taunton Library on 28th October between 2pm and 5pm when I’ll be offering a demonstration of free design tools and Robox itself. If you’d like to see 3D printing in action at the Glass Box, get in touch and come along!

Tiny Timbot!

By | Design, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

I wanted to post up some feedback from a Robox user and share some of the amazing work he has been doing to make robots imitate life.

Jason from Mechanimal emailed us this very watchable robot.

Not only is he walking, he’s using his arms to help balance, like he should, and he’s using his tiny little eyes to detect obstacles. That’s no wind up toy, that there is an autonomous robot, tiny baby version.

Laser Beams!

Posted by Jason Bannister on Wednesday, September 28, 2016

It has 8 independently controlled servo motors, an IR sensor for eyes, 2 microphones, a speaker, and all of the control circuits are in it’s wee little head. A total of 18 pieces in two colors, all from my Robox, and he stands but a few inches tall. Not bad for my first project using the Robox, super excited to make more complex parts with the new dual material head.

And a HUGE thanks once again, this is the machine I’ve been waiting 15+ years for.

 

Check out some of Jason’s other work, Tiny Timbot will lead you into a whole world of mechanical animals. You can even get involved by becoming a patron here.

Circuit Specialists get a Dual Material Head upgrade and talk to Ben Hudson about Robox

By | Robox User Blog | No Comments

If you head West from the CEL office on the West coast of UK, across the North Atlantic and drop South a little you will hit the East Coast of USA. Travel further West through many of the states which form the US until you find Tempe, Arizona. If you reach the West coast you have gone too far. Tempe is home to Circuit Specialists; a retail store offering just about every thing you could need to build, maintain and test electronic devices. These guys know their stuff having sold semiconductors and the like for over 35 years.

Recently they had a visit from Bed Hudson who works for CEL to maintain Robox units for our US customers. Ben installed one of our new Dual Material Kits into one of the stores demonstration machines. They made some very informative videos about their experiences and had a long chat with Ben. You can check this out in their blog via the link below.

www.circuitspecialists.com/blog/robox-dual-material-head/

AutoMaker 2.01.03 release and TechABS

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, News, Software Updates | 6 Comments

Hi Robox Users,

We’ve got some new features in AutoMaker to let you know about which are around making results match expectation and warning users when Robox cant continue. We’ve also release a new formula of ABS which is making it the material of choice for me right now.

AutoMaker Improvements

  • SurePrint enhancements
    • Off-bed model checks occur at project load time
    • Prints cannot be started if a model is off-bed
    • PLA is ejected if not required during a print with high bed temperatures
    • Bed temperature is lowered to PLA levels and raft is enabled if PLA and a different material are in use simultaneously
    • Improved post-processor and slicer failure indications

In previous versions the post processor was responsible for checking the sliced model to ensure that head movements were not beyond the ability of Robox, we now check the model before it is sliced to ensure it fits inside the build volume and thus wont generate moves that can’t be performed.

We’ve seen a few Dual Material users printing with PLA and and another materials that need higher temperatures at the same time, this has the potential to cause problems.  If the PLA filament gets too hot before it reaches the head it can jam the system, to overcome this and still allow these two materials to be printed together we’ve introduced some automated systems. Firstly, if the PLA was loaded but not used in the print we simply eject it just before the print to ensure it out of the build environment. If PLA is used for the build alongside another hotter material then AutoMaker now uses the PLA target temperature for both the bed and ambient, to ensure that the model sticks to the bed raft is automatically switched on.

AutoMaker check that the combination of the raft thickness and the models height to ensure it still fits into the build volume.

There are a number of checks that the post process does to the sliced model before allowing the print to start, if the print cant continue we now let the user know why whenever possible. This includes when the print exceeds the build volume due to switching on features like spiral printing and brim.

Without taking away options from users we hope that the above features will enable more prints to be successful and less chance of jamming or damaging your Robox.

Since the last release we noticed a few small issues which have also been addressed in this release;

  • Fixed macro selection issue – DM macro incorrectly selected in some situations when SM head mounted on dual-extruder printer.
  • Settings for Support, Raft, Brim now fit on the screen correctly
  • Bed axes move correctly when AutoMaker is resized
  • Calibration improvement – prevents apparent leak of nozzle when starting nozzle open calibration (only experienced by a minority of customers)
New materials – techABS
I’m very excited about this! ABS is the material of choice for many design engineers, its mechanical properties are well rounded and can have a mirror polish, it accepts a wide range of glues and paints as well as sanding and cutting nicely. Its a bit more difficult to print perfectly and warping and shrinkage have been a cause of pain on may prints. This new formula goes a good way to fix this, it prints at a slightly lower temperature and requires a cooler bed to stick down. A lower shrink rate along with these other properties means that parts print reliably, have good mechanical dimensions and have a beautiful surface finish.

Dr. Cory Glenn’s Implant Pearls and Products

By | Healthcare | No Comments

Based on Cory Glenn’s Dental Town Post ‘Cory Glenn’s Implant Pearls and Products‘.

If you have a Dental Town login you can see the discussion here: Dental Town Message Board

  • CBCT planning and guided surgery will save you money by decreasing the time needed for surgery, making your surgeries more precise, decreasing the need for lots of inventory, and making your restorative costs more predictable.
  • CBCT planning and guided surgery will make you more money through increased case acceptance, more referrals, giving you confidence to tackle more cases, and by helping determine which cases will be complicated and/or less profitable

Dr Glenn writes:

Which Implants To Use

Everyone’s titanium integrates……. some just integrate much cheaper!

  • Use a value branded implants with a good track record like Blue Sky Bio (my favorite)
  • Use a conical connection with a platform switch
  • Use implants with aggressive threading

Reduce Your Risks:  Failures are the Kiss of Death

  • Flap everything you can and bury the implants with primary closure in a 2 stage approach.
  • Flap rather than punch at uncover to gain keratinized gingival by rolling it to the buccal
  • Avoid immediate placement until you’re very experienced.  I suggest grafting all sites with                 Maxxues 50:50 Mineralized/Demineralized FDBA ($51 for 0.5cc) mixed with Fusion Bone Binder (Woodland Hills Pharmacy) and covered with a collaplug in single rooted teeth or a Cytoplast TXT-200 Nonresorbable membranes ($40) in molar sockets
  • Stick with shorter implants (8 and 10mm lengths).  There’s almost no value in a longer implant unless primary stability is of the utmost importance (ie immediate and single staged implants which you’re not going to do…… right!?
  • Stay 2-3 mm from anything with a name (inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, etc)

Tips to do More Implants

  • Learn to do conservative crestal sinus lifts. 30% of all potential implant sites you encounter will need a sinus bump or a sinus lift.
  • Buy a CBCT.  Having to refer out for scans creates a much bigger barrier than you realize.  Most dentists find that the number of implants they do doubles once they get CBCT in office.
  • Plan cases in front of the patient.  The purpose is twofold:  you will be able to confidently tell them whether you can do the case and what it will cost right then and there.  It also creates a significant “wow factor” when your patients see you using this level of technology and planning.
  • Lower your prices.  Price is your gas pedal.  If you want to do more, step on the gas and lower fees.  A routine single tooth placed guided takes me an average of 2 hours total time and 3 appointments from start to finish.  Even by charging a bundle fee of $2500, you’ll still generate over $1,000 an hour.
  • Offer in house financing:  Implants are perfect for financing since they won’t get the final product for several months after starting the process.  Not staying current with payments? No implant crown for you!
  • New to Blue Sky Bio?  Listen to this webinar to learn more about the company, the owners, and their products. http://www.blueskybio.academy/public/New-to-BlueSkyBio.cfm

Recommended Product List for Guided Surgery

Read Full Post on Dental Town Including:

3d Printers… 
3d Printing Labs…
What you will need to get started…
Much More
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