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Design

Who gets your Vote?

By | Design, News | No Comments

So today is the day, the time is ticking – who gets your vote in today’s General Election?  Do you want a Tory, Labour or Lib Dem led government?

If you haven’t yet decided, but want to have your say, we at CEL Robox can help.

We have created 3 new political party pledge stones, each of which depicts the main pledges of the three traditionally ‘leading’ parties.

Our stones are based on the now infamous ‘Ed Stone’ which hit the headlines over the weekend as Labour leader Ed Miliband unveiled his 6 key pledges in the form of a giant stone tablet, seemingly suggesting that once the pledges were in stone, they could not be broken.

But not everyone follows Labour, and here at CEL Robox we wanted to give people a fair chance to air their views, and at the same time peruse the three main party’s pledges before placing their votes today.

Anyone can access our designs of the stones to download and print out, by visiting the Tinkercad links below:

https://tinkercad.com/things/hYiaIUUfPz2

https://tinkercad.com/things/htep0DQ6uDt

https://tinkercad.com/things/7yvE9jv2ZKD

The ballot boxes close at 10pm tonight – that should give you just enough time to print out your favourite stones and make your mind up who to vote for!

3D Printed Birds of Prey Ward off Pigeons

By | Design, Press | No Comments

The skills of our in-house service technicians extend far beyond expectations on a daily basis here at Robox HQ, and indeed this past couple of weeks our very own Martin Moore demonstrated his CAD capabilities once again by creating 3D hawks and owls for an international media story (his previous skills saw Jeremy Clarkson depicted as a ‘Hungry Hippo’)

The purpose of the prints was to capitalise on the world-wide hatred for pigeons and in doing so, demonstrate the capabilities and day-to-day uses of the Robox.

Martin set about designing the birds from scratch, his only brief was to create these known enemies of the pigeon so that people could print them off and place them on ledges outside their windows or in their gardens to scare pigeons away; we wanted them to be useful, funny and decorative.

hawkpic1

And now all the hard work has been done for pigeon-haters across the world as the designs are now available to print from myminifactory.com.

birdspic2
Already the story is gaining traction, with The New York Observer being the first to cover the news:

“A 3D printing company may have just launched one of NYC’s most successful advancements in the fight against pigeons.

A company called Robox created 3D printing designs for pigeon scarecrows that have already proved successful at keeping away the urban birds.

The designs include an owl and a hawk, both printed at a smooth resolution of .2mm. Robox themselves have been printing the mock predatory birds with PLA-composit and placing them around the city. They’ve found that pigeons are so frightened by the watchful and intimidating gazes of the 3D printed birds that even the incentive of food isn’t enough to convince stray pigeons to stick around in their presence.

“If you find that pigeons are plaguing your stoop, rooftop, or garden, you can print either one of our hawks or owls to keep them, and their ‘gifts,’ at bay,” Chris Elsworthy, CEO of Robox, told The New York Observer.”
Read more at http://observer.com/2015/04/3d-printed-scarecrow-owls-are-successfully-ridding-nyc-of-those-godawful-pigeons/#ixzz3ZGaPZv9A

owlpic1
3DPrint.com also followed suit, illustrating just how annoying these birds can be to city dwellers:

“The human population of New York City is fed up with the population of pigeons. Flat out. Finally. How to battle them, without bringing on legions of PETA members? And what might scare a pigeon? How about the thought of a bird of prey snatching them up in their claws, carrying them away to their city lair? Or a predatory hawk? Pigeons don’t stand a chance. At least that’s what the folks at CEL, who created the Robox 3D printer, want them to think, as they’ve used 3D printing to employ an age-old method: the scarecrow.

Soon, you may be seeing colorful 3D printed birds of prey scattered around areas heavily infested with pigeons, who will have no choice but to flee to other cities with less creative and technologically savvy citizens. The 3D printed predatory birds can be placed on the ground in city parks to thwart the scavenging, pooping pigeons, and can also be placed on decks, window ledges, doorsteps, and a variety of other platforms.”

Read more at http://3dprint.com/62231/cel-3d-print-birds-of-prey/

For now, Martin is back in our technical suite, perusing the coverage which drops in as a result of this particular campaign, servicing our valued customers and awaiting the next ‘design challenge’!

A Movement in the Making – www.custommade.com

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Loving the graphics these guys use, had to share this blog from www.custommade.com:

 The Emergence of the Maker Movement

The maker movement is made up of some 135 million adults in the U.S., however, it’s more than just a U.S. movement. Maker faires that celebrate the movement have popped up in Japan, Italy, Norway, and Chile. Makers use their skills to craft items such as clothing, baked goods, jewelry, and art; contributing $29 billion to the U.S. economy annually.

From 3D printers to laser cutters—makers employ various tools to create their goods. Many gather at makerspaces where they share these resources. Makerspaces are havens for techies, artists, and entrepreneurs. Through crowdfunding, makers are able to facilitate small-scale funding for these gathering spaces.

Learn more about the maker movement below and how it’s influencing the way we craft.

A Movement in the Making

A Movement in the Making
Infographic by CustomMade

3D printing, education and families – a 3dprintingindustry.com interview with Chris Elsworthy, designer of Robox

By | Design, Education, Press | No Comments

A very nice interview and article by Davide Sher from 3Dprintingindustry.com

Chris talks about 3D printers in education and getting some value from “screen time” which accounts for a long periods of spare time for many children, typically in games. Chris suggests that more of this time could be spent learning the skills they will use in later life and 3D printers can be a link between the virtual creations of our children and reality. This is certainly evident in the new offering from the Tinkercad folk in Tinkerplay which is aimed directly at getting children into design by making it really fun.

Read more from Davide  in the link below
http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/03/24/roboxs-ceo-chris-elsworthy-says-time-mass-3d-printing-now/