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Education

Robox, the #1 3D printer for education

By | Education | No Comments
 

Blackfield Primary School

Year 6 pupils use Robox to learn about insect anatomy.

 

St Andrew's Primary School

East Ayrshire's STEM Coordinator, Martyn Hendry, takes Year 5 pupils through designing custom name tags using Autodesk's free, browser-based Tinkercad software.

 

Complexity made simple

Robox now supports both single and dual extruders with its new dual-material upgrade module, allowing even more complex geometries to be printed with ease.

 

Inspiring a new generation

A Year 4 class in Blackfield Primary School uses Tinkercad and Robox to create stationery organisers for a school project.

 

Mendip Studio School

Year 11 students discuss their GCSE projects.

 

Ashlyns School

A student upgrades his AS-Level project with Robox.

 

Safety and Quality

The interlocking safety door prevents accidental injury and maintains a stable printing environment.

 

FAWE School, Rwanda

Students from Writhlington School provide 3D printer workshops to Rwandan students.

The safest and easiest to use 3D printer for education, Robox delivers professional results with an award-winning user experience.

  • Needle valves ensure only desired material is printed with no need to retract or wipe nozzles
  • Hassle-free build plate with no glue, toxic sprays or tape required
  • Only desktop 3D printer with an interlocking safety door
  • Rapid head (<1 min) and bed (<4 mins) heat-up times
  • Compatible with 3rd party filament – no vendor lock-in
  • Automatic material recognition with no setup required
  • Fully automatic bed levelling and easy calibration

“If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.”
ALL3DP.com

“Features like automatic bed leveling, easy-to-use software, filament auto-load, and SmartReel filament technology made setup a breeze and very beginner friendly.”
Make Magazine 3D Printer Guide 2017

“I selected Robox 3D printers to go into all our Primary schools after extensive research. The locking door ensures that the printing area is a safe environment and hands cannot make contact with hot components. The ease of printing and easy removal of the printed models are very user friendly.“
Martyn Hendry, STEM Coordinator, East Ayrshire Council

“We assessed Robox against a number of other popular 3D printers and it came out on top in terms of portability, ease of use, safety, design and print quality.”
Scottish Library & Information Council

Learn how to Fabricate an In-Office 3D Printed Surgical Guide for $20 with a $1500 3D printer with free software.

By | Education, Healthcare | 3 Comments

Presented by: Dr. Rick Ferguson

Date: Saturday, January 28th, 2017
Time: 8:00AM-6:30PM
Tuition: $1095. Optional Second Day $500 – Fabricate a guide for your own case.
CE: 8 Hours

Location: Porsche West Broward
4641 SW 148th Ave
Davie, FL 3331

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

Rick Ferguson lectures throughout the world on a variety of implant surgery and restorative topics. He is the Director of Implant Educators which runs a seven month program teaching general dentists and specialists how to become implantologists. Dr. Ferguson is a Diplomate of the ICOI, an Associate Fellow of the AAID, clinical assistant professor at the University of Florida and a visiting lecturer at the University of Miami. Dr. Ferguson has taught implant dentistry and hands-on bone grafting courses which have been attended by thousands of dentists over the last 18 years. He is currently in private practice in Davie, Florida.

REGISTER NOW. CALL 1-954-319-5606

e-NABLE – the most inspiring 3D print project I’ve seen

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Education, Printables | 3 Comments

I was recently introduced to the e-NABLE project by our friends André and Guillaume at Le Comptoir 3D

This is an awesome venture that aims to get functional 3D printed hands to people around the world.  Heard this before? Well e-NABLE takes a different approach… Anyone with a 3D printer can make a difference thanks to the network of e-NABLE volunteers around the world.

These hands don’t replace expensive, highly functional natural looking prosthetic hands – but they’re not meant to. Children who have limb differences can’t always get prostheses (partly because they’re growing) so these hands can make a real and immediate difference to their lives.

Take a look at this video from e-NABLE to see what I mean.

Now tell me you don’t want to use your Robox to make a difference.

Visit http://enablingthefuture.org/ for more information on how to help.

And if you’re a student or teacher reading this then please take a look at http://www.handchallenge.com/ and involve your school in this amazing project.

The story of e-NABLE is inspiring – you can be part of it too.

Here’s my first print of a Raptor hand produced on a Robox – I’ll add more pictures when it’s assembled.

Raptor 3D printed prosthetic hand

Thanks for reading!

Ian

 

DENTAL SCHOOL OFFER: Free Surgical Guide Exports. Print Surgical Guides on Campus.

By | Education, Healthcare | 2 Comments

Blue Sky Plan has become the favoured surgical planning tool for dental work. The software lets you work and plan your cases for free and has an excellent selection of tools to allow accurate matching of scan inputs and implant hardware plus the ability to create digital surgical guides. The software is constantly evolving to keep up with the advances in dental technology and improving methods.

If you are an educator in dentistry you probably already know all this. Take advantage of the offer below to allow your students to work all the way though the export phase of case planning. Grab a Robox and print your surgical guides accurately, incredibly cheaply and without any fuss in house.

blueskyplanfreeexporteducation

TechSoft: “an amazing machine for such a low cost”

By | Education, News | No Comments

We’re very pleased to see leading education specialist TechSoft promote Robox as its No.1 choice of 3D printer for schools in their 2016-2017 Product Guide.

TechSoft was founded in the mid-1980s and soon established itself as a market-leading supplier of CAD and CAD/CAM systems. The TechSoft team have gained great insights into the technology needs and requirements of education in the years since and began supplying 3D printers to schools in 2004.

All of TechSoft’s sales and support staff are either ex-Design and Technology teachers, graduates in Design and related fields or qualified engineers. This means that they not only have a wealth of practical understanding but also understand the subject-specific issues teachers face on a daily basis.

TechSoft’s experience of low-cost 3D printers over the years allows the team to conclude that Robox “stands out from the crowd for accuracy, reliability, cost-effectiveness, ease of use and safety”. We couldn’t agree more. Thank you, TechSoft!

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Why Robox is making such an impact in education

By | Education, News | No Comments
 

Blackfield Primary School

Year 6 pupils use Robox to learn about insect anatomy.

 

St Andrew's Primary School

East Ayrshire's STEM Coordinator, Martyn Hendry, takes Year 5 pupils through designing custom name tags using Autodesk's free, browser-based Tinkercad software.

 

Complexity made simple

Robox now supports both single and dual extruders with its new dual-material upgrade module, allowing even more complex geometries to be printed with ease.

 

Inspiring a new generation

A Year 4 class in Blackfield Primary School uses Tinkercad and Robox to create stationery organisers for a school project.

 

Mendip Studio School

Year 11 students discuss their GCSE projects.

 

Ashlyns School

A student upgrades his AS-Level project with Robox.

 

Safety and Quality

The interlocking safety door prevents accidental injury and maintains a stable printing environment.

 

FAWE School, Rwanda

Students from Writhlington School provide 3D printer workshops to Rwandan students.

When I first used a 3D printer in 2005, Stratasys and 3D Systems were the only players in town and the costs of their systems were truly eye-watering. The Stratasys Dimension BST we used then cost over £19,000 and reels of filament over £200 each.

In the decade since, key 3D printing patents held by those once pioneering manufacturers have expired and the open source RepRap project has triggered a wave of desktop 3D printer innovations. The cost of 3D printing technologies has now plummeted (Robox costs less than £1,000 with reels of filament under £30 each) at the same time as we’ve seen significant advances in speed and capabilities – thanks also in part to the recent proliferation of very high quality, but totally free, 3D modelling tools. The technology has become much simpler, more affordable and therefore more accessible to everyone.

3D printers are fast becoming staples of secondary school D&T departments. Our work with the James Dyson Foundation is seeing us develop some truly exciting and innovative STEM programmes aimed at encouraging students and teachers to use 3D printers and inspiring them to think creatively about design and technology. While our work has initially focused on programmes in secondary schools, our efforts to help stimulate young people are now leading us to help develop new programmes with partner schools at even earlier stages in the education curriculum.

One exciting programme is being pioneered by Josh Rigby, D&T Leader at Blackfield Primary School, part of the Inspire Learning Federation. His Year 6 ‘Lift Off’ project is now in its second year and engages pupils to develop and build remote controlled hovercraft. They use Robox and free 3D modelling tools from Autodesk such as Tinkercad and 123D Design to customise their hovercrafts for identified target audiences.

Pupils at Blackfield Primary School use Tinkercad to create custom parts for their hovercrafts.

 
Another project he leads, titled ‘Dyson Design,’ engages Year 4 pupils in the design of modern desktop equipment for the classroom of the future. The project helps 8-year-old pupils get to grips with technical drawings and requires them to consider a range of materials for their designs, which are then developed in Tinkercad.

We’re also helping to introduce 3D printing to a pioneering, ambitious education project targeting primary age children in Scotland. Martyn Hendry, STEM Co-ordinator in East Ayrshire Council, has just completed a Robox pilot programme in a number of primary schools in his authority to see how 3D printers can be introduced into the curriculum. Working with projects he’s developed to inspire creative thinking, and supported by entrepreneurs and people from industry, teachers have reported a very enthusiastic response from pupils. One school has even broadened the project to the Primary 2 year group of 6-year-olds.

Malachy Ryan, from engineering consultancy Alan White Design, demonstrates design innovations to pupils at St Andrews Primary School as part of the DYW programme.

 
Martyn is helping to ensure Robox plays its part in the Scottish government’s youth employment strategy, Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) – a seven-year programme that aims to better prepare children and young people from 3-18 for the world of work. The success of the Robox pilot programme and Scottish government programmes such as DYW herald the beginning of a much more ambitious rollout of 3D printers to schools and organisations in the region.

Dumfries House Education, a cluster of six bespoke training centres situated in the stunning 18th century Ayrshire Dumfries House estate, is one such organisation using Robox to help deliver experiential, hands-on activities for young people. The centres offer a selection of education and training programmes designed to support learners in Primary and Secondary education with the Engineering Education Centre’s aim being to excite young people about science and technology. Dumfries House Education grew from HRH the Prince of Wales’ desire to see young people engage in learning experiences that promote confidence, personal development and offer training in real life skills. Their inspirational workshops are available to schools, youth groups and local authorities in the region and Martyn is actively involved helping to integrate 3D printing into their programmes.

Robox is providing schools with a more cost-effective, straightforward option to bring 3D printing to classrooms and workshops around the UK. As a British 3D printer manufacturer making the world’s only desktop 3D printer with an interlocking safety door, we are uniquely placed to work with the James Dyson Foundation and schools across the country to help improve learning outcomes and empower teachers and schoolchildren to invent, to think creatively about design and technology and not be afraid to make mistakes. Martyn Hendry reports how 3D printers and computer-aided design (CAD) software have helped children as young as 9 understand mathematical concepts such as negative numbers: “There was just no justification for using CAD without a 3D printer. 3D printers embed the technical drawing while the teaching and learning is embedded in the use of CAD.”

For more information about what we’re doing, read a previous article here or contact me directly using the links below.

SLA vs FFF / FDM workflow and space requirements

By | Education, Healthcare, Materials, News | No Comments

SLA (Stereolithography ) is often compared to the FFF (Fused Filament Fabrication) / FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling) process of 3D printing and always shows very impressive results. The detail level is far superior for SLA but there are a lot of complications to the process. Due to the huge numbers of dentists, dental labs and orthodontists contacting us recently I thought I would share some of what I have learned.

The most common comparison is the strength of the parts created from resin vs those created with fused filament which always comes out on top. Next are the many resin handling issues which make filament printers much easier and safer to use.

It is easy to discount FFF/FDM completely by just looking at pictures of the excellent smoothness of an SLA print vs an FDM print. The SLA process can create a smoother and more detailed surface finish and and can create a fully solid, partially transparent part which is difficult to achieve on FFF /FDM machines without post processing. This makes it harder for those of us demonstrating fused filament fabrication printers to keep a viewers attention.

To someone viewing the printed results of 2 models side by side it would be hard to choose the FFF / FDM print if visual quality or surface detail was the goal. In a comparison of useability which requires strength, the FFF /FDM print is far more likely to come out on top particularly due to the huge selection of material types available. The SLA materials tend to be closely linked to specific printers, it is unlikely a 3rd party resin will be allowed or compatible. This limits the SLA user to the resins developed by that manufacturer. In a comparison of workflow the SLA process is quite scary, warning labels and notes on resin handling and cleanup dominate but the consumption of core components of the SLA printer along with litres at a time of IPA (Isopropyl alcohol) and the expensive resin is certainly worth exploring before any decision is made to exclude filament printing. The accuracy of the two methods should theoretically be the same but I have yet to see an SLA print which has been perfectly dimensionally accurate while my Robox is within 0.01mm in all axes without my input all day every day. Cost comparisons are far further apart than the price of the printers would suggest. SLA resin cost is high, plastic filament cost is low. This expensive resin is wasted with every print, plastic filament is only extruded as required. This cost in particular is not shown in “part cost comparisons”, nor is the very wasteful rinsing in IPA to remove excess resin following a print or the cost of the consumable resin carrying and curing parts, or the disposal and storage as well as low shelf life for expensive SLA resins. Oh and the space required for SLA printing is rarely mentioned, you really need a spare room and some strict policies to control the spread of sticky resin the smell and the harm to the environment.

Click the image to make it bigger.

In the chart below I’ve listed some positives and negatives of each method along with typical usage and costs. Blue indicates the best in my opinion for each row. I obviously support filament printers in this, perhaps your comments can sway my opinion?

FDM SLA
Limited detail, high accuracy, layer lines visible High detail and accuracy, layer lines hard to see in some cases
Parts and excess material can be disposed of in regular waste Resin waste and printed parts require special disposal. H413: May cause long-lasting harmful effects to aquatic life
No material wasted except with support creation, no mess Wasted resin is washed away in IPA and disposed of regularly in build tank, sticky residue from resin spreads around work area and is hard to clean. Disposal of cleaning products restricted
No use by date on filament with low cost 12 month shelf life and high cost
Material is inert and harmless before and after printing Requires special handling equipment
Can be used in any work area Requires special work area
Materials are widely available and cross compatible Only specified resins can be used with most SLA printers
Minimal requirements for storage of material Requires special storage conditions for resins and required cleaning chemicals in large quantities
No additional equipment Cleaning baths, UV Light booth, safety, storage and disposal equipment
Minimal space required to function Considerable space requirement to keep several large pieces of equipment away from other equipment and work areas
Range of materials in many colours and with a huge range of mechanical properties Very limited range of materials, locked to manufacturer
Opaque parts unless post processed Optical clarity in some materials
Material dependant useable indefinitely  Low shelf life of parts due to UV exposure
Low cost of consumable parts High cost of consumable parts
Material cost is low $25 per kg Material cost is high $99 per kg + processing and waste!
Medium flexural strength  (material relevant to medical use) Low flexural strength (material relevant to medical use)
Low upfront equipment cost High upfront equipment cost, printer and additional equipment
Potential for dual material with dissolvable or peel away support Single material with mechanical removal of support
System allows dual material for overmolded parts and pause features for inserting captive objects No system for inserted or overmolded parts
No training required for use or handling High level of materials handling trainingrequired

 

My conclusion is this:

SLA is not a threat to FFF / FDM printing, if anything the 2 methods can work side by side as their benefits do not overlap. Personally I would not let the resin (or the smell of it) near my home or my family but if I had a dedicated space within a business and the training and staff to run this then I would consider SLA as an addition to several far lower priced FFF /FDM printers. I could print many iterations of a design on the filament printers and perhaps a surface model on the SLA machine once the design was final, actually it might be best to just outsource that part…

SLA should remain in the hands of professional labs or dedicated service providers, FFF /FDM is for everyone. In fact with the low cost of filament printers, every designer should have one on their desk.

CEL Robox, “a workshop in a box”

By | Education | No Comments

“Robox is an amazing tool for learning. In my studies, it has allowed me to bring my ideas and concepts into the physical world. Producing something traditionally which is as complex or intricate as what can be produced using a 3D printer, would require years of training on professional tools or be impossible to be produced as a single object. This obviously would be an impossibility for a student who wants to envision their ideas into reality. As a student myself, I do not have the skills or knowledge to use high level manufacturing equipment, but have unique ideas. By removing the complexities of the production process, it allows multiple ideas to be produced with ease.

“The innovative design of the Robox 3D printer allows easy to load materials, again, reducing the complexity of the production process. Its simple UI offers ease of use to both new and experienced users with the advanced functionality. My favourite feature is the heated bed, this allows printing to start up almost immediately, and not require bed preparation; which is the case for many 3D printers.

“Robox allows people like myself, to be able to envision our ideas, and make them reality. By having physical objects, we learn from mistakes in design, and gain a more practised knowledge of design. Robox is essentially a workshop in a box.”

Writhlington-SchoolJames Stewart
Student
Writhlington School

Robox is best when it’s in pride of place

By | Education, News | No Comments

We’re delighted to see Robox taking pride of place in Technology Supplies’ new 2016-2017 Design & Technology Catalogue as the first product in the CAD/CAM section. Having been awarded the #1 position in a section including 26 other 3D printers, and with over 7k printed catalogues now in circulation, we’d like to thank the team at Technology Supplies for playing their part in helping to make Robox the leading 3D printer for education.

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For over 30 years Technology Supplies has been supplying innovative Design and Technology products, services and solutions to over 17,000 educators worldwide. They are a leading supplier for 4,275 UK secondary schools but also cater to primary and higher education.