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Printables

3D printed woodturning chucks and jaws

By | Printables, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

Robox user Henry @henry sent us some pictures and an article about 3D printer use in wood turning.

Henry writes:

“I am an avid wood turner. I bought my Robox to use with wood turning. I am seeing more and more wood turners turning to 3d printing in different ways.”

Henry wrote an excellent article about 3D printer use within woodturning which was published in American Woodturner issue December 2016 vol 31, no 6 which you can view here.

“This June the American Association of Woodturners is having their annual symposium in Kansas City Mo. This is the largest woodturning symposium in the world with turners from all over the world.

Prior to the symposium I printed up a bunch of chuck holders. They are small and take about an hour to print and are something every woodturner needs. I found one turner who is definitely buying a Robox next week. A couple of people who  have printers and wanted my file. A bunch of people who read my article on 3d printing but could not relate it to woodturning until I showed them the chuck holder. One demonstrator had 3d printed parts that they were using and another is going to bring them up in his demonstration on Sunday. I still have 4 more holders to give out. Here are some pictures of the chuck holders.”

It is really great to get feedback from Robox users and to see how 3D printing is working it’s way into all aspects of creation. 3D printing is not just for new technology applications, it is a new tool which can help with traditional techniques.

As with any tool, a 3D printer should make a task easier, not be a task in itself. These are great examples which show Robox as a part of a tool set, not just a 3D printer.

e-NABLE – the most inspiring 3D print project I’ve seen

By | AutoMakerNewsflash, Design, Education, Printables | 3 Comments

I was recently introduced to the e-NABLE project by our friends André and Guillaume at Le Comptoir 3D

This is an awesome venture that aims to get functional 3D printed hands to people around the world.  Heard this before? Well e-NABLE takes a different approach… Anyone with a 3D printer can make a difference thanks to the network of e-NABLE volunteers around the world.

These hands don’t replace expensive, highly functional natural looking prosthetic hands – but they’re not meant to. Children who have limb differences can’t always get prostheses (partly because they’re growing) so these hands can make a real and immediate difference to their lives.

Take a look at this video from e-NABLE to see what I mean.

Now tell me you don’t want to use your Robox to make a difference.

Visit http://enablingthefuture.org/ for more information on how to help.

And if you’re a student or teacher reading this then please take a look at http://www.handchallenge.com/ and involve your school in this amazing project.

The story of e-NABLE is inspiring – you can be part of it too.

Here’s my first print of a Raptor hand produced on a Robox – I’ll add more pictures when it’s assembled.

Raptor 3D printed prosthetic hand

Thanks for reading!

Ian

 

Print a Popup Poldark

By | Printables | No Comments

Click the download button to make your own Popup Poldark to fit official Tomy Pop Up Pirate games.

The file is RoboxDual compatible, just drag the 3 .stl files into AutoMaker at the same time and select materials by double clicking on the group to select each part. If you have a single material printer the objects will print as a group.

Please note that Tomy and CEL advise not to insert anything except the original parts into the spring loaded device for safety reasons. 3D printed parts are not intended for children who may choke on small items.

Spiral Printing on Robox

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, Printables, Software Updates, Stuff and Things | 4 Comments

If you’ve downloaded the latest version of AutoMaker then you may have noticed that we’ve activated Spiral Printing for you to play with. Robox is particularly good at spiral printing as it offers the highest ranges of wall thickness without having to remove and replace the nozzle.

Below is a quick guide on how to best use this new feature.
There are a number of things that you should be aware of when trying this feature.

  1. Only place one object on the bed at any time.
    Because of the nature of spiral printing the flow of material from the nozzles does not stop and start. Placing more than one object on the bed means that the models would be impossible to print in one continuous extrusion.
  2. Ensure that your print has only one continuous island from bottom to top.
    This is for the same reason – multiple islands on any layer means that the flow of material has to stop and start. Spiral printing is designed to avoid this.
  3. Consider how thick you want the base to be
    This is one of the few controls Automaker has for spiral printing, the number of layers you choose and the layer thickness will equate to your base thickness before spiral printing starts. The first layer is always 0.3mm and as a guide I would ensure that this is the minimum filament width to ensure good adhesion to the bed. The sequence layers heights are controlled by, yes you’ve guessed it, ‘layer height’. So for example if you’ve chosen a layer height of 0.2mm and 5 base layers your spiral print with have a 1.1mm thick base. (0.3mm + (4 x 0.2mm))
  4. Think about what wall thickness you want
    After the base of your part is completed the system moves to the spiral printed section, continuously moving up as it orbits the perimeter of your design laying down a single line of filament. The wall thickness is controlled by the perimeter width and because its only going to be done in one pass you may want to increase it and use the larger 0.8mm nozzle to create wall thickness of up to 1.2mm. As a guide I’ve found that the ratio between layer height and wall thickness should be between 2:1 – 5:1, the thicker the wall and the smaller the layer height the more likely overhangs will be printed perfectly.
  5. The part must be solid, not hollowed out with a wall thickness
    Because we are using ‘Solid layers at Bottom’ and perimeter thickness to control the thickness of your part the part needs to be a solid to start with. If you want an inner and outer shell, and don’t mind a hollow centre you can use an idea I had when designing the is thermal mug: add a very thin cut down through the part to make each layer a single perimeter again. On the photo below, you can see that the sequence of printing is outside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> inside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> outside surface of the bowl… and so on…Thermal MugSpiral Mug Section Small
    6 . Your design is less than 99mm tall
    Robox has a 100mm Z-build height, but because of the way Cura adds the Z move to every move on the layer sometimes the sliced part will come out slightly above 100mm. The post processor will throw this out as impossible print, so to avoid this scale your part to ensure it is less than 99mm high.

Robox_spiral_cup_iso

You can download the cup above from this link. robox_spiral_mug.stl

Robox_spiral_lee_hand

Or the Vase with Support engineer Lee’s face on it by clicking the image above. LeeVase_Mk2.stl

Robox DM Locking Ring

By | Design, Printables, Prototype Build | One Comment

This part is the locking ring which twists onto the dual material reel holder axle to lock it in place. The small black cylinder in the main image above.

On it’s own it is not particularly useful unless you lose yours. This one will print nicely on it’s end. I expect someone will use this model as the basis for a 3rd party reel holder which can be clamped onto Robox. Please link your reworked files in the comments and we will add them to the main post if they are worthy.

roboxlockingring_POLYPC

Above is printed in Polymaker PCPLUS polycarbonate.

Download .stl here

Tick Twister

By | Printables | No Comments

Download  I've printed a Printable

As we’re in for an inundation of ticks this summer, we here at CEL have designed this handy tick twister. So if you find a Tick on yourself, a family member or a beloved pet, you no longer have to put up with a tacky supermarket tick remover or wait days for amazon shipping. Just print this handy Tick twister and get it out asap!

Recommended settings;

Resolution: Normal or Fine
Infill: 20% – 40%
Material: ABS

It is very important that the first layer is printed at 0.1mm (100micon) or less.

Removing a Tick can be a tricky business, there are a few rules that need to be followed to prevent infection as advised by BADA UK;

  • The tick’s body must not be compressed, as this can force out saliva and gut contents which may contain disease-causing organisms.
  • The tick should not be irritated or injured, as this may result in it regurgitating (vomiting) saliva and gut contents along with any disease-causing organisms.
  • The mouth parts of the tick should be cleanly removed along with the rest of its body.
  • The tick should be removed without causing the host discomfort.

When removing the Tick, wear rubber or plastic gloves.

How to use the Tick twister;

  1. Engage the tool by approaching the tick from the side (the body of the tick is flat when unfed) until it is held securely.
  2. Lift the tool very lightly and TURN IT (clockwise or counter-clockwise). The tick detaches itself after 2-3 rotations.
  3. After removing the tick, disinfect the bite site and wash hands with soap and water.
  4. You may want to save the tick for identification in case the person or animal the tick was attached to becomes ill within several weeks. To save the tick, write the date of the bite in pencil on a piece of paper and put it with the tick in a sealed plastic bag and store it in a freezer. Your doctor / vet can then identify that a tick bite has occurred and use this information to assist in making an accurate diagnosis.