Stuff and Things

Ossum Racer, Part 1: Developing the Concept

By | Ossum's Blog | No Comments

In the last post I introduced myself, in this post I’d like to introduce the project.
I have a real soft spot for the raw nature of roughly 1930’s era, often single seat, open cockpit race cars. The crazier the better. I don’t really consider myself a “car guy” but I love cars that evoke an emotional response, and to me there is nothing quite like a set of wheels strapped to a Merlin V12 to get the pulse racing.

As it happens, there really aren’t (m)any RC cars in this category, and as far as I know, no 3D printable ones. I aim to correct this travesty! My goal is not to build a specific replica, but a believable and functional model, built around component designs that we will be able to reuse in future models. Since many of the real cars like this were one-off builds, such as Jay Leno’s ridiculous(ly awesome) 1917 Botafogo Special,  this seems totally reasonable.

As with a real car of this nature I will let the functionality direct the form to some extent, and so I begin the process with sketches.
First I decide on some rough dimensions, and do a side view and top view sketch on graphing paper, before scanning those and importing them into Fusion 360 at the correct scale. While I plan to design all the parts, including wheels and drive-train, for printing, I want to keep them to a size where standard RC parts can easily be swapped in too.

Next I make a simple pose-able mock-up of a human figure at 1:10 scale and pull in RC components that I designed for my 1:10 rat rod build, this allows me to check that the scale is feasible.

Things look ok, but a rough body shape shows a bit of a problem, these narrow bodies don’t have nearly enough space for a regular-sized battery, which I would really prefer to use, so it may need to grow a little.

Raising the motor slightly is undesirable from a center-of-gravity point of view, but might be a solution, alternatively, does our driver really need legs, he has a sweet car to get around in anyway…

Before spending too much time of these problems I will start with design work on the mechanical components: transmission, front and rear axles especially, because they will dictate everything else. Tune in next time and keep an eye on Ossum in the meantime for behind-the-scenes posts!

You can follow along here if you like:

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BLOG 1: Jason “Ossum” Suter Introduction

By | Ossum's Blog | No Comments

This is the first of what is going to be a series of blog posts in exciting collaboration between myself, Jason Suter (known as “Ossum” around the web), and CEL-UK, the creators of the Robox project.

Before I get stuck into what we are planning to do I feel it would be best to introduce myself. I am an electrical engineer in the telecoms field for my day job but apparently have never quite grown up, because I still dream of being a toy designer or building props for movies. I have been designing projects in CAD for 10 years now but it is been over the last 2 years when I when I got access to a 3D printer that I was really able to start making those dreams come to life, at least in my spare time!

I am passionate about designing things that “do something” with a mechanical or electronic element, so I seem to have naturally fallen in with the RC crowd, but really my projects and interests are diverse, you never know what might happen next.

My first major printing project was a 1/10 scale RC rat rod, which I designed in Fusion 360, had the body printed via Shapeways and the chassis laser cut from aluminium. The design files I released won me a 3D printer, which really got the ball rolling.

I diverted into some mechantronic interior design, if there is such a thing, with a blooming flower night light which was featured in make magazine. This was a challenge to build something that would have been completely impossible for me to do without CAD and a 3D printer.

I went back to my roots with an RC 1/10 scale Willys MB Jeep and M416 trailer, which has been extremely popular. I get a real kick out of seeing my designs being built around the world, it helps me justify the hours that I spend working on them if I know they will be amortized over many builds!


There are some other weird projects in the middle like my giant LEGO skeleton where I flipped the scale and went 10/1, he ended up being 40cm tall!

Besides designing and building myself, I really enjoy getting others interested in tackling it themselves, I have really enjoyed the vibrant community that has sprung up around my designs. Here you can find the facebook page and group.

I have had the idea for a fully printable RC single-seater vintage racer brewing in my head for a while now, and in collaboration with CEL-ROBOX I will finally be bringing it to fruition, and sharing it with the world.

Over the course of the next few months I hope to bring you along on my journey through the design process, and with any luck, inspire you to tackle some things of your own. I’ll be posting fortnightly updates here and on my pages. In the next post I’ll be going into my design goals and how I get started on a project like this.

If you want to discuss any aspect of the project with me, I now have a forum section for this project which you can find here.


3D printed woodturning chucks and jaws

By | Printables, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

Robox user Henry @henry sent us some pictures and an article about 3D printer use in wood turning.

Henry writes:

“I am an avid wood turner. I bought my Robox to use with wood turning. I am seeing more and more wood turners turning to 3d printing in different ways.”

Henry wrote an excellent article about 3D printer use within woodturning which was published in American Woodturner issue December 2016 vol 31, no 6 which you can view here.

“This June the American Association of Woodturners is having their annual symposium in Kansas City Mo. This is the largest woodturning symposium in the world with turners from all over the world.

Prior to the symposium I printed up a bunch of chuck holders. They are small and take about an hour to print and are something every woodturner needs. I found one turner who is definitely buying a Robox next week. A couple of people who  have printers and wanted my file. A bunch of people who read my article on 3d printing but could not relate it to woodturning until I showed them the chuck holder. One demonstrator had 3d printed parts that they were using and another is going to bring them up in his demonstration on Sunday. I still have 4 more holders to give out. Here are some pictures of the chuck holders.”

It is really great to get feedback from Robox users and to see how 3D printing is working it’s way into all aspects of creation. 3D printing is not just for new technology applications, it is a new tool which can help with traditional techniques.

As with any tool, a 3D printer should make a task easier, not be a task in itself. These are great examples which show Robox as a part of a tool set, not just a 3D printer.

Dual extrusion 3D printing

By | Education, Stuff and Things | 2 Comments

Coinciding with the glowing RoboxDual review (click here to read) published recently by All3DP, RoboxDual is fast becoming the leading dual extrusion 3D printer in schools, colleges and universities.

Whether it’s in a leading university like Imperial College London, where they’re using more Robox and RoboxDual 3D printers in their new 3D printing lab than any other model including MakerBot, LulzBot, BCN or Ultimaker, or the scores of primary schools in Scotland where Robox is the 3D printer of choice in a number of council-wide digital learning schemes, the award-winning Robox platform is offering new opportunities to enhance STEM learning as the safest and easiest to use 3D printer for all stages of education.

For a start, RoboxDual represents incredibly good value for money at £1,499 when compared to its closest competitors, Ultimaker 3 and BCN Sigma, which retail for £3,354 and £2,263 respectively. Indeed, many in the industry have commented on the poor value for money Ultimaker 3 represents, especially when you consider the fact that dual extruder prints on Ultimaker’s most advanced 3D printer now take double, triple or even quadruple the time to complete (I’m not exaggerating – read a review here). Ultimaker 3 is almost twice the price of its predecessor but it’s clear from the reviews it’s received since launching that it’s far from twice the value. Reviewers also point to the Ultimaker design starting to look quite dated now.

How much longer do dual extruder prints take to complete on RoboxDual? Well, this is where our patented needle valve flow control technology comes into its own. Single and dual extruder print times are virtually identical on RoboxDual thanks to these needle valves (click here for more info on this critical tech). I’d highly recommend you compare the elegant nozzle changing mechanism of RoboxDual with the clunky and time-wasting mechanism adopted by Ultimaker to get an idea of how valuable these needle valves are. You can watch a great video of RoboxDual in action on our last Kickstarter page.

It’s also worth mentioning that Ultimaker 3 does not support a 0.8 mm nozzle whereas RoboxDual is compatible with the Robox QuickFill head, which includes both a 0.8 mm and 0.3 mm nozzle. In fact, RoboxDual comes with the dual material head (2 x 0.4 mm nozzles) and QuickFill single material head as standard in the box.

In terms of speed, aesthetics and certainly value for money, RoboxDual wins hands down, every time.

Take a look at the new Robox Education page on our website where you can read reviews and testimonials, download literature and watch a great new video we’ve put together:

CEL RoboxDual 3D Printer Review: Dual Extrusion Redefined

By | News, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

A glowing and very detailed review of RoboxDual from – All about 3D printing.

Images from

Alastair Jennings from writes:

early comparisons against the UM3 show that the RoboxDual’s dual extrusion system is far quicker.

The quotes keep coming, we read the comprehensive review with glee!

If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.

Quality-wise, single extrusion prints are as good as you can get from a fused filament fabrication (FFF) printer, and ABS print quality is almost identical to that of the Ultimaker 3. Dual extrusion prints are equally impressive, mixing materials and colors well.

Filament from any manufacturer can be fed into Robox, either directly from the source reel or wound onto a SmartReel with a custom profile written to the EEPROM memory on the reel. This gets around the initial worry that you’ll be locked to high priced filaments and any limitations of range.

If you’re looking for a quality desktop 3D printer for the home, office or classroom, then there’s little not to love about the formidable CEL RoboxDual.

Unlike many competitors such as Lulzbot and Ultimaker, CEL have from the outset aimed to create a printer that could be used by anyone safely and without the need to tinker. The Lulzbots and Ultimakers are fantastic class-leading machines, but the RoboxDual offers something a little more refined.

For this reason the RoboxDual is a very different machine from others in its class, as it utilises custom electronics, extruders and hot-ends. These components aren’t designed to be tinkered with, which makes that RoboxDual one of the few printers out there that really should find wide appeal in workplaces and schools rather than just the maker community.

Ultimaker, Lulzbot and Makerbot might be better known brands, and there’s no doubting their abilities and quality when it comes to printing. But the RoboxDual and Robox have both been designed as a usable mainstream printer, much in the same way as any 2D printer of old.

From the outset, everything about the CEL RoboxDual shows that this is the work of engineers rather than hobbyists, with a set of design and development features that are not slapdash but carefully considered.

What did they think about the price?

Why block up one large printer when you can print on multiple? The downside is of course the cost; more printers means a greater outlay, but then the Ultimaker 3 is more than double the price.

The filament is also provided by some of the best known filament providers in the world, including ColorFabb and PolyMaker, and there’s a good selection available. If you want to use your own filament then you can, either by feeding it in and telling the software which filament profile to use, or by loading it onto an empty SmartReel and updating the circuit info through the AutoMaker software. The system is open and easy to experiment with.

In a busy design technology classroom, the noise from the RoboxDual at full print speed is unnoticeable, and even when printing in the office the noise is perfectly bearable.

Print extraction from the platform is the fight that folks least enjoy about 3D printing, whether that’s trying to extract a model from the perforated base of the Zortrax M200, lever a print from the glass base of the Ultimaker 2, or dunk a resin-coated masterpiece from a Form 2. With the RoboxDual (RBX02), however, is a print platform that we can learn to get along with.

Stop! You are embarrassing us…

It’s been designed by engineers as a tool, something to be used on a daily basis without issue. In those terms we would say that this is the first 3D printer that truly mimics the ideology of a standard paper printer. It sits there in the corner of the room and prints without any fiddling or calibration, it just gets on with it.

As innovations go, the RoboxDual is packed with features that constantly reveal themselves the more you delve into settings and options.

Dual extrusion 3D printers are becoming more prevalent, and the market in this sector is rapidly expanding. At this point in time, the RoboxDual offers a printer that is cost effective, reliable, and offers great quality beyond any other dual extrusion printer on the market at this price.

Factor in the pricing, innovation and future modular expandability, and it’s difficult not to recommend the RoboxDual.

Running Man!

3D printing a stress-free Xmas

By | Design, Stuff and Things | No Comments

No Christmas is complete without a mad dash for presents in the final few days. If you’re like me and have left shopping to the last minute, there’s really no alternative to an exhilarating, stressful day of retail shopping to guarantee you can deliver on the big day itself.

But this doesn’t have to be the story. In fact, why buy presents at all? If you have a 3D printer, why aren’t you making them? You don’t need to design your own presents. That’s far too much effort in the run-up to Christmas. Instead, you can download any number of free gifts from online libraries like MyMiniFactory or Thingiverse. You can even personalise the models you download with free software such as Microsoft’s 3D Builder to make your gift even more personal.

The gift you make doesn’t even have to be good. The fact that it’s been 3D printed will be enough to blow the recipient away. And isn’t it the thought that counts anyway?

If you own a 3D printer, let it help you de-stress your Christmas and save a packet in the process. 3D printing your own gifts is fun and extremely cost-effective. What kind of bracelet could you buy for 47p?

xmas-2016And if you don’t own a 3D printer, perhaps you should consider making one of your New Year’s resolutions to involve yourself in this exciting, liberating technology. Robox recently won 3D Hub’s award for best “Plug ‘N’ Play” 3D printer in the world for the 2nd year running. Anyone can become a maker, especially with Robox.

Tiny Timbot!

By | Design, Robox User Blog, Stuff and Things | No Comments

I wanted to post up some feedback from a Robox user and share some of the amazing work he has been doing to make robots imitate life.

Jason from Mechanimal emailed us this very watchable robot.

Not only is he walking, he’s using his arms to help balance, like he should, and he’s using his tiny little eyes to detect obstacles. That’s no wind up toy, that there is an autonomous robot, tiny baby version.

Laser Beams!

Posted by Jason Bannister on Wednesday, September 28, 2016

It has 8 independently controlled servo motors, an IR sensor for eyes, 2 microphones, a speaker, and all of the control circuits are in it’s wee little head. A total of 18 pieces in two colors, all from my Robox, and he stands but a few inches tall. Not bad for my first project using the Robox, super excited to make more complex parts with the new dual material head.

And a HUGE thanks once again, this is the machine I’ve been waiting 15+ years for.


Check out some of Jason’s other work, Tiny Timbot will lead you into a whole world of mechanical animals. You can even get involved by becoming a patron here.

Spiral Printing on Robox

By | Chris Elsworthy Design Blog, Design, Printables, Software Updates, Stuff and Things | 4 Comments

If you’ve downloaded the latest version of AutoMaker then you may have noticed that we’ve activated Spiral Printing for you to play with. Robox is particularly good at spiral printing as it offers the highest ranges of wall thickness without having to remove and replace the nozzle.

Below is a quick guide on how to best use this new feature.
There are a number of things that you should be aware of when trying this feature.

  1. Only place one object on the bed at any time.
    Because of the nature of spiral printing the flow of material from the nozzles does not stop and start. Placing more than one object on the bed means that the models would be impossible to print in one continuous extrusion.
  2. Ensure that your print has only one continuous island from bottom to top.
    This is for the same reason – multiple islands on any layer means that the flow of material has to stop and start. Spiral printing is designed to avoid this.
  3. Consider how thick you want the base to be
    This is one of the few controls Automaker has for spiral printing, the number of layers you choose and the layer thickness will equate to your base thickness before spiral printing starts. The first layer is always 0.3mm and as a guide I would ensure that this is the minimum filament width to ensure good adhesion to the bed. The sequence layers heights are controlled by, yes you’ve guessed it, ‘layer height’. So for example if you’ve chosen a layer height of 0.2mm and 5 base layers your spiral print with have a 1.1mm thick base. (0.3mm + (4 x 0.2mm))
  4. Think about what wall thickness you want
    After the base of your part is completed the system moves to the spiral printed section, continuously moving up as it orbits the perimeter of your design laying down a single line of filament. The wall thickness is controlled by the perimeter width and because its only going to be done in one pass you may want to increase it and use the larger 0.8mm nozzle to create wall thickness of up to 1.2mm. As a guide I’ve found that the ratio between layer height and wall thickness should be between 2:1 – 5:1, the thicker the wall and the smaller the layer height the more likely overhangs will be printed perfectly.
  5. The part must be solid, not hollowed out with a wall thickness
    Because we are using ‘Solid layers at Bottom’ and perimeter thickness to control the thickness of your part the part needs to be a solid to start with. If you want an inner and outer shell, and don’t mind a hollow centre you can use an idea I had when designing the is thermal mug: add a very thin cut down through the part to make each layer a single perimeter again. On the photo below, you can see that the sequence of printing is outside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> inside surface of the bowl -> half the handle -> outside surface of the bowl… and so on…Thermal MugSpiral Mug Section Small
    6 . Your design is less than 99mm tall
    Robox has a 100mm Z-build height, but because of the way Cura adds the Z move to every move on the layer sometimes the sliced part will come out slightly above 100mm. The post processor will throw this out as impossible print, so to avoid this scale your part to ensure it is less than 99mm high.


You can download the cup above from this link. robox_spiral_mug.stl


Or the Vase with Support engineer Lee’s face on it by clicking the image above. LeeVase_Mk2.stl

Back in stock!…..oh wait, no, sold out again…

By | Stuff and Things | 3 Comments

So we had a shipment delivered…but…they are all going out again over the next 2 days, none left at CEL-UK. You can still buy from our resellers


I think it might be the schools buying them all, maybe dentists, maybe both….oh no, maybe it is DENTAL SCHOOLS!

We are making more. If this keeps up we might need to cancel warehouse leave…or get the engineers to do some physical labour 😀